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14

I have a friend (anecdotal, of course) who has lived in Japan for 11 years. He learned Japanese only 3 ways: (a) girlfriends, (b) manga & anime, and (c) male Japanese friends. His pronunciation is very natural; he's so comfortable in the dirtier parts of the language that he can bawl out a taxi driver. I've witnessed him tear apart a guy on the street ...


13

While i agree with you that there is a lot of Japanese from anime that can't be used in daily conversation, it can still be a valuable learning tool in ear training, pronunciation, culture acquisition and vocabulary acquisition. And knowing the culture goes along way towards learning how the language is used.


13

According to Zokugo-dict: Masuo-san refers to the husband of Sazae-san in the popular anime "Sazae-san", Fuguta Masuo. Masao-san lives together with Sazae-san and their parents at their parent's home, and it's come to mean a person who lives at their wife's parents' home. Furthermore, it's become used in a broader sense to refer to a son-in-law ...


12

The main issue you're going to run into is explained in this answer, specifically: Avoid learning from manga until you're at a level where you can make the difference between what you hear and what you can say. In spite of this, there is a rough guideline you can use to determine which anime you might be able to use to learn even basic ...


10

Borrowing from page 277 of this grammar textbook and the Daijisen entry flamingspinach linked to, ぞ is a (primarily masculine) sentence-ending particle used to express strong intent (そうはさせないぞ), persuade someone to go along with your action (そろそろ行くぞ), or (directed at yourself) indicate your judgment or resolution (うまくいったぞ). なあ can usually substitute for ぞ ...


9

As others have said, this is probably really ~やしない, which is transmutation of ~はしない. What this suffix does is usually one of two things: It makes the verb a topic (with は) and then negate it. This is used to bring up the event described by the verb and then saying it won't happen (or isn't happening, have never happened - you get the point). From the ...


7

This actually most likely Oosaka-ben's variation of 「や」as「よ」, becoming something like: なんか買ってくれよ! The usage is explained in more detail here: http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%82%84?dictCode=OSAKA (Japanese) EDIT The original quote from the just in case site downtime happens: ...


6

の[方]{ほう} is just a way of emphasizing "about". Apart from that, what about the public safety department? Literally, it means "direction". A similar way of saying Xの方 in English would be with "on the X side of things", i.e. Apart from that, what about the public safety department side of things? P.S. There was a similar question where the OP ...


6

"Hikarian" is a proper noun, and unique to this anime. Ordinary dictionaries don't have this word. In the Wikipedia article, I can see almost all of the characters are named after Japanese trains or famous stations. English Wikipedia article has many links to the original Japanese trains. According to the Japanese article, "Hikarian" is the name of a ...


5

Isn't this "ワンピースは実在する!" from this anime/manga? It's not related to dresses or swimsuits. http://youtu.be/bFb5h9hl9Ig?t=2m3s (at around 2:03) http://opwymtk.sakura.ne.jp/mystery/tcotop.html In this manga, ワンピース is a name of "ultimate treasure" searched by pirates, and very little is known about it. Characters in the manga even do not know whether ワンピース ...


4

Well, when you are learning a language, everything would be useful, even Anime, TV commercials, and also even spam emails will let you learn a lot. You just need to adjust or choose more common/polite usages when you really use it.


4

なのね lends the same emphasis to a sentence as なんですね. However, なのね is more conversational, informal and can come across as feminine. According to my teacher, people who end all their sentences with this kind of emphasis in real life can come across as self-important, presumably because it sounds like they're attaching added importance to everything they say. ...


4

If we uncontract 振んなきゃ, we find that it's undergone these three contractions:   振らなければ  →  振らなけりゃ    (eba → ya)   振らなけりゃ  →  振らなきゃ     (erya → ya)   振らなきゃ   →  振んなきゃ     (/ran/ → /rn/ → /Nn/) In other words, the full form of 振んんなきゃ means "If [you] don't swing [the bat]". That's conditional, though, so something should come after it; and if nothing does ...


4

話になんない=話にならない Literally you could translate 話にならない as "won't become a story". However, as a phrase it generally has two meanings: Not worth discussing; be beneath mention; out of the question; unthinkable. Be pointless (waste of time) trying to discuss the matter with smb. So, the quoted phrase could be translated more literally as "Anyway, there's ...


4

I think "I won't bother to stop you" or "I don't bother stopping you" would be more close. And that "ra" might be "rya", but I don't know rya can be shortened to ra or not. Edit: above is my hypothesis about "ra", but after watching the anime provided by Amanda S, I hear as "ya-shinai" too as other said in comments. Regarding や-しない, I can't find in 国語 ...


4

大丈夫と思います。漫画を読んだら読解力を増えて、早速適当な日本語を読めるようになる。読解力を増えることは一番大事な物です。 (probably awkward grammatically). I think it's fine. If you're reading manga, it will bring up your reading level and you'll soon be able to read proper Japanese. Bringing up your reading level is the most important thing.


4

In Kansaiben, や replaces だ and よ


3

The largest part of learning a language is vocabulary training, especially in Japanese where you pretty much have at least two words for every single thing. For that, Manga and Anime are not the most practical (you learn a lot of vocabulary you do not really need all that often), but on the other hand, knowing more words is always good, even if they are not ...


3

I'm assuming that 止めりゃしない was misheard as 止めらしない, where that りゃ is a contraction of りや to りゃ. Instead of 止めらしない it should be 止めやしない. I've seen it written and heard it said as 止めりゃしない but I suppose you can consider that a "slang mistake" treating 止める as a go-dan instead of ichi-dan. (止めやしない is more common). 止めやしない is [RYK(masu form)+や+しない], which has the ...


3

According to this, the original man'yougana version of this poem has ふ, but this particular makura-kotoba in other poems is written either with ぶ or with spellings that could be read either way. At some point in the past this poem's version ended up changed to match the rest, but whether or not the original was supposed to be ぶ anyway is unclear. As for the ...


3

かな can state any degree of probability, from nearly zero to all but certain. Another important feature is that かな conveys intent of communication, thus it could imply request or desire so much as English "I wonder". This word is usually only used in non-polite sentences (in most cases, the polite counterpart is でしょうか). Down to your particular case, the ...


2

I haven't seen the show, so I'm uncertain of the context, but かな refers to "probably" in the translation. Ending a sentence with かな is a very casual way of expressing uncertainty. For example: あの人はアメリカ人かな。 I wonder if that person is an American. It's subtle, but "probably" might be a slightly too "certain" translation in this case (but again, ...


2

Yes, it is a very emphatic sentence-ending particle. Also ぜ. They seems stronger than よ (in my opinion). I think they (ぞ/ぜ) are very informal though, so where you could use よ for emphasis in a polite and/or formal way, you probably shouldn't use these. I think their usage must be a regional or demographic thing. When I lived in Osaka, I never heard it ...


1

As far as I noticed, many people use 行くぞ - Lets's go and it is used like 行こう/行きましょう(意向形)with a bit stronger sense when talking to group of people, mainly if speaker is kind of coordinator / leader.



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