New answers tagged

2

It is quite obvious. It's a bit awkward, but I'm not sure I'd call it a 'train wreck'; there's not really a better way to say exactly that. There's really no ambiguity - *XがYが cannot be read as 'X (subject) and Y (also subject)' because you would say that in some other way, likely either XとYが or sometimes (in more formal speech) X、Yが. Two case-marked nouns ...


6

Actually, this kind of "double が" situation happens all the time. Sometimes there's just no elegant way around it. In this case, Aさんは doesn't feel exactly right because these notifications appear out of the blue with no surrounding context. In cases where brand new information is coming in, が usually feels better in introducing it. Imagine it sort of like an ...


1

You can look at the verb it's used with. Examples: 自分でやります - I will do it myself 自分でやってください - Please do it yourself


1

Without knowing the preceding part of the sentence you gave, here’s my literal translation of your snippet; “Aren’t you resting yourself innocently on your father and something that is ruling over everything of your being, including your father who lived like that?” “そういう父” literally means “the father like that” “or “the father of that kind” in English, ...


1

Technically it could be ambiguous, but I don't feel any ambiguity from that sentence. Without context elsewhere, it seems to be natural to be read that そういう父 is a …支配するもの. In my opinion, it's like そういう has a great effect on interpretation. そういう means "that kind of" or "like that", so regardless of what そういう modifies, it expects a target of reference that ...



Top 50 recent answers are included