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8

From what I've read, the original meaning of "かわいい" had less to do with "cuteness", and more to do with inherent qualities such as weakness, small size, docility, etc., that engender a feeling of pity. As far as I recall, the change in meaning to "cute appearance" is fairly recent. So it could be that either "かわいそう" just hasn't caught up with the new meaning ...


7

You say X に [入]{はい}れる, but X を [入]{い}れる. The answer to these type of questions always seems to be the same, but you need the context to decide on a reading for a particular 漢字. There are many examples for when the reading of a 漢字 is dependent on the context, and the word pair you quote is one of the easier ones to guess, because [入]{はい}れる is an intransitive ...


6

My answer builds off of rdb's answer. My understanding is that ~そう for usage of "seems" cannot be used for actual information that is apparent. I.e. you can't say "she looks cute" using そう for someone you are looking at. Though, you get on the slippery slope when you want to say something like "she sounds cute" after you get off a phone conversation. But ...


6

First of all, I do not think that people use かわいそう to mean “seemingly cute.” But I cannot pin down the reason of this. I think that it is at least partly because かわい+そう would have the same form as かわいそう meaning “pitiful.” However, I am not sure if this is the only reason. As you noticed, かわいい describes appearance. I cannot think of a context where 白そう ...


6

This happens a lot in patent translations, so you might get some hints by searching for these terms: 特許 請求項 翻訳 This site has this example: A dynamic random access memory including at least two banks, each of said banks including memory cells arranged in rows and columns, said memory cells storing data provided by at least one bit line and by at ...


5

I've found several webpages online which talk about the sentence 黒い髪のきれいな女の子 as a famous example of an ambiguous sentence. (For example, this blog post). Here are a couple ways in which this sentence could be considered ambiguous: 女の子 could mean a female child or a woman's child. 黒い could modifies 髪, meaning black hair, or it could modify (髪のきれいな)女, ...


3

You are exactly right: it can be translated as "whatever X is in charge of" or "whoever is in charge of X." Thus, Xの担当を決めたら? can be both "How about deciding what X is going to be in charge of?" and "How about deciding who's going to be in charge of X?" To give an example, 掃除の担当を決めたら? is "How about deciding who's going to do the cleaning?" and ...


3

I agree with sawa that from syntactic clues this fragment is ambiguous, but there are actually more syntactic clues if you look at the whole sentence, which is: あなたが呼べば主は答え、あなたが叫べば「わたしはここにいる」と言われる。 It would be possible, but quite perverse (and impious, as Sawa notes!) to interpret the 言われる in the second half as a passive rather than an honorific form ...


3

I hear かわよさそう used frequently as a substitute for かわいそう, and sometimes its altered companion, かわよい. I presume it's very slangy and I feel perhaps a bit feminine, but it does exist nonetheless. Another workaround might be to use 可愛{かわい}らしい, which while technically different, at least approaches the intended meaning. As for when it's used, I don't think it ...


2

It seems to be a lot about nuances. You have someone talking about it on this page. It says that you can replace 少し with ちょっと in most cases but it's less common the other way around. Then it lists few examples when the sentence does not convey exactly the same meaning based on which one you use. One of the example is from a book and it talks about the ...


2

Just from syntactic clues, this sentence is ambiguous. Taking into consideration that this is from the bible, it is very likely that the usage here is subject honorification. If it were passive, then it would slightly entail that あなた (or you) is bothered by the God by being said that he is here. That would be an impolite thing to write for a God.


2

I don't see anything wrong with solution 1, but not because it makes it easier for the speaker. Breaking up complex ideas also makes things easier for the listener to digest, piece by piece. Of course it's ridiculous to take it to the level of "Here's this. Here's that. That relates to this in a certain way. . . ad nauseam". But you can and probably should ...


2

I think that you are looking for written expressions in Japanese which are ambiguous at some level. Of course, an easy way to get ambiguity in written text is by using homographs, which is often resolved by considering the meanings: 書の[大家]{たいか} authority of caligraphy アパートの[大家]{おおや} the owner of apartment 彼女は京都に[行]{い}った。 She went to Kyoto. ...


2

I'm looking to test some Morphological Analysis tools, which split sentences into tokens and provide part of speech and pronunciation information. One of the beauties of Japanese is that there is no need for "pronunciation information". No diphthongs, "silent e", etc. Knowing the 振り仮名 is enough. Anyway, not sure of your purpose, but how about this old ...


1

To a certain extent they are just different levels of politeness. Check the following: ちょっと待って! 少し待ってください 少々お待ちください 少々(しょうしょう)> 少し > ちょっと The phrases get longer the more polite they are. Also, I believe ちょっと is more of a spoken phrase than a written phrase.



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