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4

The concatenation of て verb represents several actions which are done one after another. For example, 持って行く means "bring" followed by "go". No, this is not always true. Te-form can combine two verbs like the English conjunction "and", but it does not necessarily mean the two actions happen one after another. For example, te-form can denote a method. ...


0

I don’t feel the nuance of 色々とあって from the mother’s remark, 「色々とお母さん、 言いたい事が溜まってるの」. To me it sounds like she is only saying, “Mom has a lot of thing (piled up) that I want to tell you.” 「いろいろと」 simply means “various.” Of course, many things should have happened before the mom made this remark. Her son made a lot of things that vexed her. But that is an ...


5

You have a choice; You can say it with or without 「は」. The more informal the speech, the more often the 「は」 is dropped. The only situation in which 「は」 is not optional and it must be used is when you talk about what someone ate/will eat this morning in comparison to what he ate/will eat on another day. That is always 「けさは」 as 「けさ」in those cases is an ...



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