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I'm generally pretty strict on these kinds of questions, but considering that this particular block of text is kind of dense and hard to understand, I'll offer some help in parsing it. I'll break it apart bit by bit. ポーランドのプロニスクで生まれ Born in ~ Poland パレスチナ移住後はユダヤ系住民のイギリス軍への参加を呼びかけると共に After emigrating to Palestine, he called for all Jewish ...


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Your example may be translated as 彼女は[熱狂的]{ねっきょうてき}に歌った or something similar. This 熱狂的に with a particle-like ending に is actually an adverbial form of a na-adjective 熱狂的な, and is very properly translated as "enthusiastically". Otherwise you can say it like 彼女は熱狂をもって歌った, where 熱狂をもって resembles "with enthusiasm" in appearance, with "with" being sometimes ...


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There's at least three types of words in Japanese that can be called "adverbs" in English grammatical terms. There's the 〜く from of what are called [形容詞]{けいようし} "keiyoshi" or often in teaching "i-keiyoshi" (e.g., [楽]{たの}しく) and there are [形容動詞]{けいようどうし} "keiyoudoushi" or in teaching it to foreigners "na-keiyoushi" plus に (e.g., [具体的]{ぐたいてき}に). The pattern ...


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I don't have the reputation to add a comment, so I'll post a reply. I think it is best to think of やはり (typically) as essentially "after all...!" For example, your friend said he wasn't very hungry but he ended up eating a lot: Yahari, onaka suiteita! On the other hand, さすが has a very nuanced difference. I like to think of it as something like "that's ...



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