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21

YOU and Mark have already mentioned that 全然 can be used with a small set of positive descriptions, and that this is usage is not considered correct (which might be true, but it's absurdly common, so that doesn't really matter). But my impression is that the positive version of 全然 is not really limited to a small set of words, but rather to particular ...


16

とっても is a spoken variant of とても, just like すんごい is a spoken variant of すごい and あんまり is a spoken variant of あまり. If you're writing a paper or speaking in a formal setting, it's better to use とても.


13

Comparing ぜひ来てくださいね。 きっと来てくださいね。 ぜひ expresses a hope/wish, whereas きっと expresses an expectation. (必ず would express obligation.) A teacher telling his students "きっと来てくださいね" means more like "I am expecting everyone to come". Thus きっと feels stronger (it's an expectation, after all), but may just mean that whoever is inviting really wants you to come. ...


13

Like YOU mentioned, Zenzen being used with positive words is slang and not correct Japanese. That being said, Japanese people use it all the time, especially young people. Typically I hear 全然 with OK、大丈夫、平気, 楽しい、and きれい with others possibly I haven't heard. That is to say that the words that are used with 全然 in a positive sense are probably limited to just ...


12

Note: This is not a direct answer to your request for further usage examples of the two terms in different verbs. I rather try to explain the nuance with the help of a diagram and a pair of contrasting examples for each of the verb you gave. As you state in the question, both すっかり and さっぱり is about the completeness of something. The difference is that they ...


10

[大]{だい}[好]{す}き and [大]{だい}[嫌]{きら}い are somewhat special in that sense. Both 大{だい} and 大{おお} can be used with other words, but usually 大{おお} goes with 訓{くん}読{よ}み words and 大{だい} with 音{おん}読{よ}み words: [大]{だい}[問]{もん}[題]{だい} serious problem 大{おお}急{いそ}ぎ pressing, urgent One exception would be 大{おお}掃{そう}除{じ}. Prefixing おお or だい, however, only ...


9

can I use “Totemo totemo daisuki desu”? Whether you can use it or not depends on the context. I think that “totemo daisuki” is redundant and therefore it is better to use either “totemo suki” (without dai-) or “daisuki” (without totemo) when some formalness is required. However, in informal contexts, there is nothing wrong with using the redundant ...


9

とっても is just a strong form of とても according to 大辞泉, so both are correct. It has similar pronunciation (may be a bit different intonation) with 取っても, so may be it could confuse some. But usage of とっても can be found since 昭和30年(1955) (at least) from this song called 月がとっても青いから by 菅原 都々子 (すがわら つづこ) So, I believe you can use it most of the time but if ...


9

I looked the at the use of 感じる a few months ago. I came to the following conclusions: The verb is usually transitive (他動詞) ; it takes を with a noun (including embedded noun phrases with の)but It can also be intransitive (自動詞): Space ALC list it as both and give the example ~が退屈に感じる (feel bored [uninspired]) It can also take と to mark a ...


9

Not only "too [big]" and "very [big]", but I have also very often heard "so [big]" added to the mix of confusion by semi-conversational Japanese (not sure it's related, but it sure sounds like it). A potential lead for an explanation might be in the nuance of 「〜すぎ」in Japanese: it is generally more neutral than "too ~" in English. In fact, it is often ...


8

I'm going to assume you mean 先 as in さっき. It's usually written in hiragana to avoid confusion. I think the first sentences are just fine. The × one sounds like spoken language and ○ one sounds more like written language. In the second × sentence, though, さっき would not work because it's used for things that happened "just now" and ten years ago is not "just ...


8

これから is saying "after this", as in, after the activity or thing you are doing right then. If you're having a coffee with a friend, you're talking about what you'd do after coffee. いまから is saying "from now", as in, after this moment of time. If you just bumped into a friend on the street, you're talking about what you're going to do soon in terms of time, ...


7

Google says yes, to the tune of 1 million hits. A lot of the time it's used to describe how much you like something (とても大好きなお店). I presume that you were asking "Can you say totemo daisuki desu to someone". You can say that too (あなたがとても大好きです). Totemo daikirai doesn't have as big a number of hits in Google. Someone else will have to confirm this, but it ...


7

I believe you are making the mistake of attempting to replicate an English pattern in Japanese. As snailboat points out, the idiomatic equivalent is as follows: 泥棒はいつまでたっても泥棒。/三つ子の魂百まで。/性格を変えることはできない。 And if you make this search, http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Once+a+always+a one finds that the nearest Japanese equivalent seems to be: noun ...


7

There is no difference in utterances for both words, if you speak those alone. But if you add some words after that, you might need to use "本当に~" to get correct grammar.


6

『中上級を教える人のための日本語文法ハンドブック』 explains the expression 不運にも on p. 382 as a sentence adverb (文副詞). Some adjectives like 不運な, 幸運な, 意外な, 皮肉な, 勇敢な, 卑怯な, etc. can take も after their conjuntive form to add some evaluation, criticism, or commentary of speaker to the whole sentence. For example, the sentense 意外にも、彼は集会に現れた。 (Surprisingly, he showed up to the ...


6

The first two are used in contexts like: "do it properly." ちゃんと手を洗ってください きちんと部屋を掃除してください。 To me, it seems that きちんと implies more concentration/involvement. The result is cleaner, more polished. Thus, ちゃんとできた would be "I did it as required", while きちんとできた would be "Not only did I do it as required, but I also paid attention to every detail." The ...


6

I've always heard that "very" is 「とても」 (「とても美味しい」), whereas "too" is 「~過ぎ」 (「大き過ぎ」).


6

One usage of 「[大]{だい}」 that native speakers frequently use but Japanese-learners do not is in the form of 「[大]{だい}の」. It is treated like a compound word meaning "huge", "full-fledged", "very good", etc. 大の[宮崎]{みやざき}ファン = a huge (Hayao) Miyazaki fan 大のおとな = a full-fledged adult 大のなかよし = a very good friend 大のコーヒー[好]{ず}き = a real ...


6

I think you have hidden an answer in plain sight. The example sentences you give translate 特別に as "specially" and 特に as "especially". As far as I can tell, this is exactly how you would use them in English and Japanese. "specially" means something like "in a distinguished manner, for a particular purpose". "especially" means something like "outstanding, ...


5

As for すっかり忘れた - すっかり is an adverb that simply means "completely, without leaving anything left out". Though すっかり忘れた is probably the most common usage, here are other examples: 「宿題はすっかり終わった」 "I completely finished my homework." 「すっかり春になった」 "It's completely become Spring." As for さっぱり分からない - さっぱり is an adverb that means clean or refreshed/refreshing, and can ...


5

I think what's really going on here can be traced back to the two different ways 形容動詞 (けいようどうし: adjectival nouns or "な-adjectives") were inflected. If we look under the 連用形 (れんようけい: the "adverbial inflection", for lack of a better term) column under the first table on this Wikibooks page detailing Classical Japanese inflection patterns, we find the following ...


5

This is an interesting topic but I think the question could stand to be a bit more focused. I will throw out an answer in an attempt to inspire other people to dig up better info and perhaps the OP to make the question more specific and answerable. So "what is happening", in general terms to avoid specific theoretical assumptions: In certain kinds of ...


5

Generally, とっても gives a stronger emphasis to what you're describing, but it can be "too strong" in certain situations, such as formal and semi-formal situations(even with new friends) and real writing. On the other hand, it's generally A-OK to use とても in any situation, though for more formal situations, you might want to substitute the word out with ...


5

It's like the difference between really and reeeeally. とっても is not incorrect, but it might be a little colloquial to use in a classroom, depending on the teacher. It's even in my dictionary with a couple of examples. In the dictionary it says 「とても」を強めていう語, it makes とても stronger. とってもおいしい - reeeallly tasty! だめだなんて僕にはとっても言えない - There's no way I could say ...


5

とにかく is usually translated 'anyway', and just like 'anyway' in English, it's used to change the subject of the conversation. とりあえず has a more specific meaning. It's often translated as 'for the time being', which is quite an accurate (if cumbersome) translation, since it's used only in cases where you want to tell the listener that you want to leave the ...


5

First of all, 初めてです is verb+て+です, the te-form + です. The te-form has nothing to do with the particle で. (で can be like the te-form of だ/です, but this is not what your question is about.) です is a copula, and so Xです means "it is X". You can substitute pretty much everything for X. The best way to think about your sentences would be to interpret then as 「バスで ...



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