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As both Yuuichi Tam and user4092 have noted above, the pattern for すぎる after -ない can vary. Part of this is because the -ない ending itself has two derivations. One is from the negative 無い. The adjective つまらない "boring" evolved from verb 詰{つ}まる, originally in reference to a story or circumstance that wouldn't つまる or finish up -- imagine someone long-winded ...


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Dictionaries say すぎる in this meaning is placed: after the 連用形 of a verb, like 動きすぎる after the stem of an i-adjective, like やさしすぎる and after the stem of a na-adjective, like しずかすぎる. つまらない is an adjective so I think つまらなすぎる is natural.  Generally, when すぎる is placed after ない: in the case of the adjective ない, it uses さ, like なさすぎる as you say in the case ...


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The rule is that さ intermediates when the word stem consists of only one mora (e.g. な as in ない and よ as in よい). The stem of つまらない is つまらな, which consists of 4 moras, therefore the orthodox one is つまらなすぎる. That said, つまらなさすぎる is also accepted in practice. (edit: Some people probably find it wrong.) As for preference, I find both of them almost as frequent ...


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If an i-adjective is directly modifying a noun then it is written in the dictionary form. No conjugation is necessary, so 新しい車 is correct. btw 車 is pronounced くるま in this case. 新車{しんしゃ}is a noun in its own right. It is not a combination of an adjective modifying a noun. Adjectives can be altered before modifying the noun. For example you can say おいしそうなケーキ, ...


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There are basic rules about the use of commas in Japanese but these are not absolute. I think a writer can use commas as they like to make a sentence easier to read. And I don't think there is a clear rule in Japanese as you say.



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