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1

na/-no adjectives in total seem to outnumber -i adjectives. Values retrieved from WWWJDIC dictionary file: i-Adjectives: 2895, 268 of which is listed as a "common word"; na-Adjectives: 6759, 1425 of which is listed as a "common word"; no-Adjectives: 10832, 2799 of which is listed as a "common word". Probably because of how, like user4092 mentioned, the ...


2

I think your are right. The -なる form is attributive form of nari-adjective in Classical Japanese. We have many idioms and quotes in Classical Japanese like 健全なる精神は健全なる肉体に宿る # -なる: attributive form of nari-adjective 好きこそものの上手なれ # -なれ: imperative form of nari-adjective Poems (especially Haiku and Tanka) are sometimes written in CJ. And CJ is used ...


2

In classical Japanese, "~ぞ + 連体形" and "~こそ + 已然形" are the patterns which basically emphasize the sentences. This grammatical rule is known as 係り結び. To put it simply, when ~ぞ or ~こそ appears in the middle of a sentence, that sentence have to end with 連体形 or 已然形 (of a verb/adjective), respectively. 雪降りけり。 (終止形) 雪ぞ降りける。 (ぞ + 連体形) 雪こそ降りけれ。 (こそ + 已然形) ...


5

It can mean both, but your example is tricky because, as has been discussed here multiple times (e.g. たい vs. たがっている), one often could not directly express another person's feelings as one's own in Japanese. 「メアリーさんはつまらないです。」 in the strictest sense, only means "Mary is boring." To make it mean "Mary is bored.", one needs to add words and say: ...



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