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2

I think that along with snailboat's answer, some of these can be explained by nasalization occurring in Japanese. Where you perceive a syllable break, e.g. in [men.ju], trying to convert the phonetics to kana doesn't work out, because a final ン is usually nasal, i.e. [menjuː] menu [meɴjuː] メンユー [menʲuː] メニュー Similarly, [pain.æpl̩] / [painæpl̩] ...


1

I basically agree with the 1st 3 paras of Snailboat's answer but to put it differently: If an English word is not pronounced consistently throughout the English speaking world then, even if the spelling is consistent, you cannot predict how it will be pronounced as a loan word. "Schedule" is one example: In the States the "sch" is pronounced to sound ...


-5

Japanese is full of strange pronunciation of foreign words(most English). Although ability in English is increasing in Japan, it has been quite low especially for a developed exporting nation, and even though there has and still is a lot of interest in other cultures, things are often taken into Japan and used in a way to fit Japanese people. I don't think a ...


6

When words are borrowed in speech, they're generally "repaired" to match the phonology of the target language. In Japanese, that usually means picking the nearest consonant and vowel sounds and adding epenthetic vowels to avoid consonant clusters that aren't allowed (like /str/ → /sutor/), although other methods of repair are occasionally used (e.g. ...



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