Phrases with fixed words used as a single unit, many of which are idioms.

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1answer
121 views

Is 「お礼を言う」 considered formal?

I can only think of formal occasions when I have heard "thank you" spoken this way. Is this the case? Could it perhaps also be spoken sarcastically to have the opposite effect?
2
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1answer
100 views

What does コミュニケーションがとれる mean?

I tried looking up what 「コミュニケーションがとれる」 means, but from the examples that I've seen, all I can understand is that it just means "to communicate". Is there something more to this phrase that I'm not ...
2
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1answer
595 views

Fast Food Conversation - Any Practical Guides?

I looked up for fast food conversation but I could not find anything very practical. While most guide always emphasize on how to order, I never found it prepares one to understand what a fast food ...
2
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3answers
110 views

Why does 「頭にきた」signify being mad at something?

Is there any source or explanation for the phrase「頭にきた」and why it means to be angry? For example: 彼の言ったこととその言い方にはイライラして頭にきた。 Why does "what he said and the way he said it came to my head" mean ...
2
votes
2answers
404 views

Share your list of stock phrases / phrase templates

Do you keep a list of set phrases that you use often, or phrases that you'd use someday? I do. Here's mine, a list of phrases I've collected from work emails since three years ago. Such a list, while ...
2
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3answers
187 views

Can ことはない be used to express something other than 'you don't have to'?

I understand that ことはない is used to state that something does not have to be done, such as: 時間は十分あるから急ぐことはない。 However, I am currently translating a survey from Japanese to English for a friend and ...
2
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0answers
40 views

difference between “田中さんのこと” and just “田中さん”? [duplicate]

I'd like to compare the meanings of: 田中{たなか}さんを尊敬{そんけい}している。 田中さんのことを尊敬している。 Are the following statements true? -#2 has a much broader meaning, right? Like, I respect Tanaka as a man, a ...
2
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1answer
216 views

formality issues regarding the 「調子はどうだい?」 greeting

(1) ”元気なの?” and "調子はどうだい?" are pretty much equivalent in meaning and formality, right? The ”元気なの?” being a little feminine because of the "なの"? And, "調子はどうだい?" is rarely / never used by native ...
1
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1answer
140 views

why isn't “そなわち” in dictionaries? what does it mean?

I am pretty sure that I have heard the phrase "そなわち" used to begin sentences. Googling "そなわち" returns about 35,000 pages. Just like I remember, most use "そなわち" as a phrase at the beginning of a ...
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3answers
295 views

Can you say “よい夢へ” instead of “よい夢を”?

I saw this message created by a native speaker:「よい夢{ゆめ} を 」. That seemed strange to me. I would have expected: 「よい夢 へ 」. My thinking right now is that: 「よい夢を」 is a straight contraction of ...
1
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1answer
56 views

translation of 「あえて言えば、…」

What does the phrase 「あえて言{い}えば」 mean? What are a few example sentences? Is the following usage correct: 「好きな日本料理{にほんりょうり}はあんまりないが、あえて言えば 納豆{なっとう}ですね。」 "I don't really like Japanese food, but if I ...
1
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1answer
102 views

Using 無理 to empathise

無理 seems to be a part of some standard phrases whenever I would wish to empathise with a person who in unwell or in distress. Could someone help with examples of such phrases, and the context where it ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

How is ものがある used?

So I came across this sentence: あなたをむかえるものがある。 My take on it is: There is a thing that will meet you. I know that's wrong. So how is ものがある used? ADDED: Is there a difference between ことがある and ものがある?
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1answer
115 views

The の in のに and なのに

I've heard that the の in のに and なのに is the general-noun の (I don't remember the word for it.). So why, in that light, does the meaning of the two make sense?
1
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1answer
129 views

Does また今度 imply concrete future plans in certain regions/dialects?

This question made me remember something I'd been wanting to ask. In general, また今度 seems to be understood as a farewell ("See you later") without a later time to meet defined. However, a Japanese ...
1
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1answer
239 views

A word or short phrase for “Moving forward, taking the good things with, leaving the bad things behind”

Apparently there is a Japanese word for Moving forward taking the good things with you but leaving the bad things behind. Would any of you know what it is? Thanks in advance
1
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1answer
188 views

Is there a difference between ことがある and ものがある?

This has been split from this question.. So what are differences between two? Are there times where they can be interchangeable or can they only be used in certain situations? I saw this about ...
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2answers
107 views

Understanding a phrase - 必ずやらなければならないことを まとめてみた

I am trying to understand what looks like an expression, but seems too verbose. And I'm confused by the use of まとめてみた. To put it into context, the title of this page in my guide book is ひとめでわかる 攻略チャート ...
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1answer
128 views

Different permutations of 気 [closed]

Lots of words/expressions/phrases use 気 in one way or another. For example 気をつけて, 気味, 気になる, 気がつく, 気がする, 天気 etc... Is there a reference somewhere for the seemingly more "interesting" phrases (like the ...
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1answer
94 views

What is the subject of「あけましておめでとう」?

「あける」、 regardless of the kanji, is transitive. Therefore: While the object is「新年」、 what is the subject of「あけましておめでとう」? Regardless of what the subject is, is 「あけましておめでとうございます」 a metaphor?
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1answer
66 views

What's the difference between these two phrases?

I understand that both mean I have a newspaper but I can't see the difference. [僕]{ぼく}は一つ[新聞]{しんぶん}を[持]{も}っています。 [俺]{おれ}は一つ[新聞]{しんぶん}を[持]{も}っている。
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211 views

How to say “It's not a lie if you believe in it” in Japanese [closed]

Eijiro doesn't have the definition so I thought I'd ask here
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1answer
67 views

Meaning of せっかく [duplicate]

せっかくだから、色違いでもう一つ買おうかな What is the meaning of せっかくだから here? I had the understanding that せっかく/わざわざ are used to express the notion of someone undergoing lot of effort/pain to do something for us.
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0answers
141 views

Equivalent of “That said, Carthage must be destroyed” in Japanese

"Ceterum censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam," the famous phrase with which Cato the Elder used to finish all of his speeches, no matter how unrelated the topic was. It was probably an effective ...
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1answer
125 views

Words ending in consonants [duplicate]

Using Hiragana, how would you write a word/transcribe a sound which ends in a consonant? Such as 'kon'. Relevant to this, I don't understand why 'hajimemashite' doesn't pronounce the 'shi' in the ...
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1answer
105 views

Simple Phrases in Japanese [closed]

I was experimenting with these phrases to check if they could be used in a normal, everyday conversation in Japanese. Do these phrases make sense? Yoroshiku. (Nice to meet you.) Yoroshiku onegai ...