A relative clause is a dependent clause that modifies a noun phrase.

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Decrypting a japanese sentence

I self study Japanese and among the things I do is reading easy NHK news articles. Here is one article I read. In the article appears the word 首都 capital city. Hovering over it would give the ...
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Commas and relative clauses

Can't find rules on how commas work with relative clauses. Paragraph [click for full text] ...
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Ambiguity in meaning of sentences with a noun qualifed by an adjective with が particle

I was wondering if there is any ambiguity with sentences that have adjectives qualifying a noun, especially regarding the が particle. For example: 1.) 僕が好きな人 Can this sentences have an ambiguous ...
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Question about order of events in relative clauses. 呆れたように言う彼女を横になったまま見上げつつ、俺は持っていた本を机の上に置いた

The line is 呆れたように言う彼女を横になったまま見上げつつ、俺は持っていた本を机の上に置いた My question is about the usage of why is いう used in this relative clause and not another form. 俺は持っていた本を机の上に置いた-I placed the book I was holding ...
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Usage of て form before relative clause e.g. そう呟いて見上げる空は、朝見たもよりも輝いて見えた

My question is how to interpret this. そう呟いて見上げる空は、朝見たもよりも輝いて見えた In this sentence does it mean he was already looking at the sky before he muttered whatever he said, or can it still indicate ...
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What is the difference between using ている、ていた、た in relative clauses?

I remember seeing in the thread before that there was no difference between ている and た. So then what would be the difference between the usage of them in these sentences below? 最後に立っていたものが勝者だ ...
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What are the general principles of using verbs to modify nouns (e.g. 焦げるトースト/焦げたトースト)?

In all the time I've studied the language, I've never heard or seen anybody even hint at whether the principles from a given language (like using “burnt toast” vs. “burning toast”) carry over, or if ...
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The modification target of 忌み嫌われる

The sentence is taken from a fantasy visual novel. 現の神と古の神が相克するこの世界でも類を見ない、 双方にとって、 忌み嫌われる世界の敵 It's a bit unclear for me which clause is modified by the word 「忌み嫌われる」 Does it mean: "The ...
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Rendering an appositive “which” clause in Japanese

I've been writing little news pieces lately for practice, and I'm presently hung up on this passage. I'm trying to express the idea "This decision caused many protests, which have remained peaceful ...
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“太ってる猫” vs “太った猫”

I saw this sentence and its translation in a textbook 彼女は太った猫が好きじゃない。 She doesn't like fat cats I was under the impression that 「太ってる猫」 means something like “cat that is in the state of ...
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How do I interpret the Japanese construction of verb+noun?

A) Let's take just transitive verbs first: 食べる人 食べられる人 B) Now let's take intransitive verbs: 起きる人 起きられる人 起こす人 起こされる人 OK, this thing has confused me for a very long time now, like really long. ...
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Adnominalisation (Relative clause - noun - copula structure): What does it mean? How can we translate it?

I have two examples of this structure which does not obviously correspond to a pattern in English although it is quite common. I'd like to know what it means, why it is used and how it should be ...
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Can the appositive have more than one meaning in a phrase?

I'm looking at this phrase: 俺が話していた男。。。 I don't know if this sentence is correct in the first place, but I feel as if this can be translated two ways, specifically: The man I was talking ...
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How to translate 「まだ行ったことのないアメリカや日本に行ってみたいです」? [duplicate]

I am not sure if I understood this sentence right まだ行ったことのないアメリカや日本に行ってみたいです。 I got it like: "I want to visit places where I've never been such as America and Japan". And why is there の? ...
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How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」?

I've read that 日本人の知らない日本語 translates to: "Japanese (language) that Japanese (people) don't know". But I don't understand how or what the の does in that sentence. If I'm not mistaken 知らない日本語 could ...
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あなたがこの文のおかしいと思うところは?

The structure strikes me because the underlying transformation seems to be like this: [ あなたが ] [ この文の  ~ところを ] [ おかしいと ] 思う [ あなたが ] [ この文の  _____ ] [ おかしいと ] 思う ところは~ Another similar example is: ...
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Rules governing formation of adjectival and genitive modifications for Noun-Phrase

The following was observed in sawa's answer to "Can ごとに be replaced by それぞれ in this question?":  ◯ 正月はそれぞれの家が門松を立てる。  × 木村さんはそれぞれの会う人に挨拶している。  ◯ 木村さんは会う人それぞれに挨拶している。 それぞれの会う人 is said ...
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Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that

I love in Japanese, how adjectival clauses are just added in front of nouns like adjectives. The pizza that I ate = 私が食べたピザ But last night I became confused... In english we have words to link the ...
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How can a verb be in the beginning of a sentence when it is usually at the end? Ex. 折れた淡い翼。

When composing sentences in Japanese, the verb tends to be last right? For example, バナナを食べました。 --> I ate a banana But recently I came across a sentence where the verb was at the beginning of the the ...
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Relative clause in japanese

How do you form relative clauses that involves first person action? For example : "There aren't people I can talk to". Basically my doubt is about all those questions that require a particle like ...
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Help with a relative clause + を中心に

Here's the sentence: あるいはまた、東南アジアを中心に世界各地で活躍するいわゆる華僑勢力の多くが福建省出身者である事実を見ても、福建人たちの「海外雄飛」のパワーを知ることができる。 My rough translation is something like: "Moreover, looking also at the fact that a large ...
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Is it OK to have more than one が particle in a sentence?

If, for example, I wanted to say "I like the book that my sister gave me", would it be 姉がくれた本が好きです? I'm using Genki to study, but they don't seem to have any examples of this particular structure ...
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relative clauses without verbs

I read a sentence in Naruto that challenged some of my ideas about how Japanese works, and I'd like to try and clear this up. I can only assume that アナタがピンチの時 means "when you're in a pinch". First ...
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Why do people say 小学校の時 or 中学校の時?

When reffering to the school days, people often say 小学校の時, 中学校の時. Even though this may not be wrong, they are shortened forms of relatively complex (redundant) structures. Thus, they are close to the ...
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「悪気があっての答え」 vs 「悪気がある答え」

Hi all I was wondering what is the difference between these two sentences: 「決して悪気があっての回答ではないです。」 「決して悪気がある回答ではないです。」 I can't really make out the gist of the meaning of 「あっての」. WWWJDIC's ...
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How to unambiguously express sentences with lots of relative propositions?

Background, problem statement Very often, I find myself in situations where I have to build structurally complex sentences in Japanese, and find myself struggling, trying to put all I want to say in ...