Kana written after a kanji to complete the full reading of the word.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

14
votes
3answers
294 views

Why can some words be written with or without okurigana? How do the uses differ?

What is the difference for word compounds that can exist with 送り仮名 and without and still retain the same pronunciation? As an example: 巻き貝 と 巻貝 取り引き と 取引 If I'm correct, both of these are ...
13
votes
2answers
564 views

Splitting Kanji and okurigana at the end of the line

A question was asked on the Linguistics Stack Exchange about the oriental languages. The title was the following: How are line breaks handled in ideographic scripts? The answer made me think, and I ...
12
votes
2answers
291 views

How do I know when to read the kanji 抱 as 「だ・く」, and when to read it as 「いだ・く」, or even 「うだ・く」?

This sentence was in a grammar textbook: 彼{かれ}は同僚{どうりょう}にライバル意識{いしき}、ひいては殺意{さつい}すら抱いていた ... it means: "He regarded his colleague as a rival, even to the point of considering murder." My ...
8
votes
4answers
768 views

How can I learn and recall okurigana?

As time goes on in our age of increasing reliance on computerized kanji input, this question may become increasingly irrelevant, but when I'm writing a sentence with (gasp!) pen and paper, I have ...
5
votes
2answers
270 views

even on 常用漢字表{じょうようかんじひょう}, no kanji have an official 送{おく}り仮名{がな}?

Recently, I was talking with a friend regarding the 常用漢字表 as specified here I noticed that the 送り仮名 property of kanjis is not specified. She was a little puzzled, but concluded that the 文部省{もんぶしょう} ...
3
votes
1answer
169 views

How to distinguish between words with identical okurigana?

There are a ton of verbs with multiple readings and the exact same okurigana. Sometimes they mean totally different things and sometimes they have very similar meanings, so in the cases when they have ...
3
votes
1answer
258 views

How to parse “あけぐち”?

I'm working out my Japanese by trying to read everything around me, including food packages. On my milk carton written inside a large arrow pointing to the spout is "あけぐち" in hiragana. Obviously ...
3
votes
1answer
312 views

Homographs: how to deal with them?

For example: 一日{いちにち} = one day (duration); 一日{ついたち} = first day of the month. First of all, are the meanings correct? Because I found contradicting answers. I suspect the meanings are ...
2
votes
2answers
112 views

Are there any patterns for okurigana?

Sometimes, when learning kanji, I get tripped up because I can't remember which kana are the furigana of the kanji, and which are the okurigana. Take たべる(食) for example. I might think that たべ are the ...
2
votes
2answers
208 views

Which is the most correct (or common): 話 or 話し?

The meaning of 話, as a kanji, is "tale, talk", but as a word, it means the same as 話し: "Talk; speech; chat; story; conversation." In the official jouyou kanji chart, there's only 話, for the isolated ...
1
vote
1answer
105 views

Why the き and さ in the 送り仮名 of 大きい and 小さい?

I've always been puzzled over why 大きい isn't 大い and 小さい is not 小い. Is there some etymological reason? (I'm suspecting historical conjugations that changed the き and さ too, just like why 食べる has the べ ...
1
vote
1answer
142 views

Are there kanji which are NOT words by themselves (written standalone)?

In other words, are there kanji, which can only be used as a part of a kanji compound and/or with okurigana? For example: 見 - standalone kanji, a word which means "view", "outlook" 見物 - kanji ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Origin of on-yomi + じる verbs? [duplicate]

I have noticed there are some verbs which consist of the on reading of a kanji followed by じる: 信じる 感じる 通じる It's obviously unusual for a (non-する) verb to use on-yomi like this. My questions: Are ...
0
votes
4answers
605 views

How to know what Okurigana signify? [closed]

For example, the kanji for "one" has a kun reading of "hito(tsu)." I looked it up and found that it's the difference between "one" and "one thing," but how could you have known that without ...