敬語. Honorific speech in Japanese.

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What's the difference between ようこそ and いらっしゃいませ?

Both "ようこそ" (y­ōkoso) and "いらっしゃいませ" (irasshaimase) seem to mean "welcome" but what are the precise circumstances under which each should be used? "いらっしゃいませ" (irasshaimase) is uttered in unison by ...
19
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1answer
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~うございます - keigo い-adjectives

I'm not sure if this is actual keigo, or just a polite form of adjectives. Anyway, there are several that we're all familiar with that are still used today. はやい → おはようございます ありがたい → ...
17
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3answers
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Does “敬語” (keigo) just mean “politeness” or is it a technical term specifically relating to Japanese grammar?

What is the difference between the Japanese term "敬語" (keigo) and the English term "politeness" (Specifically regarding language)? I assumed politeness is more general covering things like "please" ...
16
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2answers
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What's the difference between 今日{きょう} and 本日{ほんじつ}?

I also see both in different examples. As in : 今日は暑い。 本日はおめでとうございます。 Both are translated as "Today", but when and how should I use either one? Can we say : 本日はあつい。 And 今日はおめでとうございます。?
13
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1answer
2k views

Does タメ語{ご} mean “casual speech”?

A debate came up on the use of タメ語{ご} in this question, and I thought it was worth its own analysis. The question is, does タメ語 simply mean "casual speech", or does it mean "speech between equals". Or ...
13
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1answer
544 views

When can I exchange くださる for いただく in expressions of gratitude?

Way back when, I remember being taught that when you want to say a really polite "thank you", sentences such as these are basically the same: 文章を訂正していただきましてありがとうございます。 ...
12
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3answers
702 views

Nuance, usage and etymology of お[出]{い}で

I observed in drama and anime (being outside Japan, those are my only ways of keeping in touch with spoken 日本語) that elder people sometimes say お出で to younger people when they want to say something ...
12
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1answer
327 views

Is there a keigo expression which can be translated as playing or pretending to do?

I have heard that, in former times, there was a very polite form of speaking in the form of, e.g., "the emperor liked playing to die" instead of "the emperor died". Is this true that there is a style ...
12
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2answers
524 views

Should I use keigo in this situation:

I work in an American subsidiary of a Japanese company. I met a few Japanese colleagues while working at the home office on an exchange. Do I need to use Keigo for: Colleague A: 1 year younger in age ...
10
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2answers
8k views

Differences between くれます, もらいます and いただきます

I have been taught that they are used when receiving something (or a favor) from someone. But how exactly do they differ? I've searched the web for an answer and One site suggests that くれます is ...
10
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5answers
316 views

Why “お食事の際は、…” instead of “ご飯を食べる際は、…”?

In the following, my textbook says that #1 is the correct choice. (1) お食事の 際は、こちらのテーブルをお使いいただけます。 (2) ご飯を食べる 際は、こちらのテーブルをお使いいただけます。 I think that both are grammatically correct and have the ...
10
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2answers
555 views

ご~いただけます vs. ご~になれます

I know that you can use ご~いただく toward "clients" (which is something I've never really understood; maybe better as a question of its own) such as ご来店いただき、まことにありがとうございます ("Thank you (customer) for ...
10
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3answers
1k views

What are common mistakes made by Japanese kombini employees speaking “manual keigo” (バイト敬語)

Mainly inspired by this question on what seems to be the misuse of a standard idiom by a Japanese employee, I was reminded of being told about バイト敬{けい}語{ご} ("manual keigo") in the past: a slightly ...
9
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2answers
516 views

What is this 「も」?

In Final Fantasy IV, a character says this line: 陛下にもお考えがあってのことだ。 "His Majesty must have his reasons [for sending you to steal the crystal]." Contextually, it does not make sense for it to be "...
9
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1answer
857 views

semantic difference between two keigo verbal forms : に なる(ni naru) and なさる(nasaru)?

Japanese grammar has a rich subset of grammatical forms named 敬語 ("keigo", formal language or respect's language). The rules allowing to transform a normal verb into a keigo verb are complex and I'm ...
8
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3answers
430 views

How many times should 「お」 and 「ご」 be used in a sentence?

In this Chiebukuro question about whether it should be ご心配無用 or 心配ご無用, one answerer says the following: 「ご」とか「お」で丁寧とか尊敬とかを表す場合、 一番最後のものにだけつけておけば 全体にかかると言われているようです。 たとえば 「住所氏名年齢職業を”お”書きのうえ」...
8
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1answer
284 views

Is いらっしゃいませ only used by staff?

Is いらっしゃいませ only used by staff, or is it used in other circumstances? When I was at a dinner at a restaurant being held after a programmers' meetup, I thought that I heard it being used by one of the ...
7
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1answer
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How do you politely apologize to a professor for unintentional rudeness?

I received an email from a new professor in my department asking for a native English speaker's check of his paper. Since no one had ever asked me to check their English before, whereas I had ...
7
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2answers
758 views

Concretely, on what scenarios should I say either お世話になっています or いつもお世話になっております?

Furthermore, what is its different in meaning between the both? When I was in training as a fresh graduate at a Japanese company, they told me to use いつもお世話になっております all the time and so I did. But ...
7
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2answers
199 views

Use of non-polite form between Japanese companies

I'm reading the novel 下町ロケット now and one part that really surprised me is when several of the members from one company speak to members of the other company without using 敬語 (for example "やめた方がいいよ”). ...
7
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1answer
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How to reply to a business email with “yes, I'm ok with this time frame”?

So I received an email from one of our suppliers who aims to visit my company and have a meeting with me, the main part of it is 12月5日(金)13時以降にご都合は如何でしょうか? Now, I am fine with the mentioned date/...
7
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1answer
224 views

Does “keigo” cover only the use of honorific/humble/polite elements, or does it cover the full range and choice of what to use and not use?

I'm having trouble putting this question into words, especially short enough to use as the question title, basically I'm confused about what the term "keigo" applies to: Is it just the addition of ...
6
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3answers
616 views

Does “こちらのテーブルをお使いいただけます。” mean “I can use the table, and you cannot?”

I would like to ask a follow-up question about the 敬語 used in Why “お食事の際は、…” instead of “ご飯を食べる際は、…”?. example sentence: こちらのテーブルをお使いいただけます。 Sounds like: I can use this table. So, ...
6
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1answer
465 views

Am I understanding ご覧になって頂く/送らせて頂く correctly?

Just for a little bit of context: There's a flyer about a Japanese church's beach retreat that's been sent around, and I'm trying to translate it for practice. That being said, the flyer has been ...
6
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1answer
224 views

What makes using ある for people okay in this context?

Yep, I'm reading a lot of Tintin in Japanese recently, and he keeps throwing me curve balls with the language. Here's another one. The situation is that the car he was in has been run off the road ...
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2answers
749 views

「拝」から始まる謙譲語 — humble keigo starting with [hai]

What are the common 謙譲語 verbs that start with 「拝」? I know these ones: 見る → 拝見する (to see), 拝観する (to view something -- limited usage) 聴く → 拝聴する 読む → 拝読する 会う → 拝謁する (although I've ...
6
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1answer
182 views

Is modern day keigo borrowed from kansai-ben? Sources?

I have heard on various occasions that modern day keigo was borrowed from Kansai-ben. It states this on Wikipedia: Historically, extensive use of keigo (honorific speech) was a feature of Kansai-...
5
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3answers
867 views

Is it rude to ask a Japanese person using keigo to speak less formally? How to do it politely? [closed]

This has mostly to do with me not understanding Keigo well, so when I enter restaurants or other service-based businesses, and they talk in Keigo to me, I hardly ever understand, which is why I always ...
5
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2answers
580 views

Polite or casual?

Is this sentence polite or casual? Or even better. Is it correct to use this casual type of sentences inside another more polite? This is the sentence: 時間がなかったからパーティーに行きませんでした。 Wouldn't it be ...
5
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3answers
448 views

When would you use 敬語 in its plain forms?

Are there any examples of people using verbs such as いただく, 参る, 申す, いたす (and their 尊敬語 counterparts, along with the various other humble/respectful verbs) in those plain forms, rather than conjugated ...
5
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2answers
509 views

Origin of -aru verbs: いらっしゃる、おっしゃる、くださる、なさる

I think all of the mentioned verbs are in the same class, because they all inflect irregularly in the same way: -aimasu for the polite form rather than -arimasu. My question is how these verbs were ...
5
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2answers
461 views

In customer settings, is it ok to ask for keigo to be repeated in more “normal” Japanese?

In the context of restaurants, convenience stores and similar situations, is it ok for a customer to ask for something that was said in keigo (or in manual keigo) to be repeated in more "normal" ...
5
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1answer
74 views

What does the 「な」 do in this sentence?

Here is the sentence said by Kansai speaker. He said this because his companion has annoyed other persons in the same room until they woke up. そら見い いよいよおきなはったあ。 I think it would work as a filler. ...
5
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2answers
159 views

Keigo form of ~てみる

What is sonkeigo form of verb-て/で+みる? I've heard somewhere 思い出してごらんになる as a keigo form of 思い出してみる, but I doubt if it's correct.
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1answer
953 views

How to turn down a job offer

I recently received a job offer from a company, say X会社. However, I would like to turn down their offer as I have some opportunity at my current place of employment. How can I express this in a ...
5
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1answer
202 views

Is 拝見いたしました an example of 二重敬語?

二重敬語 is presumably considered bad style (or simply incorrect). I hear/read 拝見いたしました all the time. Is it an example of 二重敬語? I understood 二重敬語 to be a little more complex than "used a polite form ...
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2answers
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How can I say “we met at x event” politely in an email?

I'm trying to email someone pretty high up in a company and want him to remember who I am. Edit: I met him briefly at a trade show. We exchanged business cards and spoke for less than five minutes. ...
5
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2answers
114 views

What is the difference between 「届け」and 「届ける」?

Found a phrase on article which says, 写真をお届け! i don't think it's meireikei, so why the verb doesn't end with ru?
5
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1answer
589 views

How do you politely and gratefully reply to an invitation to be published?

Is there a set phrase for politely replying to an invitation to have your academic paper published as a journal article? I presented a paper at a Japanese academic conference, and I've received an ...
5
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3answers
208 views

What are the differences between なさる and される?

I noticed なさる and される are both used as 尊敬語. What are some of their differences? How do I know when to use each one?
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1answer
126 views

The verb in いらしてください

On occasion, I hear things such as 是非、いらしてください and ここへいらしたんですか. They seem to be politer forms of 是非、来てください and ここへ来たんですか. But searching finds no verb いらす or いらしる, and so a thought came to my mind: ...
4
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1answer
152 views

Questions about `〜はる` 敬語

One thing I've never fully gotten a grasp on is the 〜はる form of "敬語", and I have some questions about it. Is it official 敬語 recognized by the 文部省, or is it just more of a regionally accepted ...
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2answers
140 views

敬語 with and without ~になる

When asking someone politely to, for example, look at something, you can say both ご覧になっていただけますか following the standard 敬語, but you can also say ご覧いただけますか. Is there any particular difference between ...
4
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1answer
121 views

Is お・ご~させていただく 二重敬語?

I want to know whether expressions such as お預かりさせていただく and ご説明させていただく are considered 二重敬語. お・ご~する is one way of making a verb into 謙譲語, and ~させていただく is another. Both are quite common, and I hear the ...
4
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1answer
435 views

What distinguishes 丁重語 from other honourific forms?

On my bookshelf I have a book on formal speech, 敬語{けいご}, and it delineates respectful speech, 尊敬語{そんけいご}, from humble speech, 標準語{ひょうじゅんご}. And it combines both of these with polite speech, 丁寧語{てねいご}, ...
4
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1answer
223 views

Why is 礼 honorific in 「お礼を申し上げます/give my thanks [to someone]」?

In 謙譲語 the addition of honorific to a direct object depends on who owns it: (先生に)本をさしあげます。| I will give teacher my book (先生の)ご本をお借りします。|I shall borrow teacher's book (先生を)会場へご案内します。| I ...
4
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2answers
115 views

おる in honorific contexts

Usually, we're told that おる is a humble verb, and that mostly holds true. But sometimes I see it conjugated to a light honorific form おられる, usually when talking about someone to whom respect must be ...
4
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1answer
243 views

Using 尊敬語・謙譲語 but not 丁寧語 on the same target

I was reading this passage from 下町ロケット (pp 15-16): {{pad}}「申し訳ないなあ、忙しいときに来てもらって。というのも、今日は折り入ってお願いがあってねえ」 徳田{とくだ}は、トレードマークの鷲鼻を指でさすりながら、佃{つくだ}にソファを勧めた。新しい会計年度がはじまって間もない、四月第三週のことである。 ...
3
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2answers
96 views

Polite form of って in 「なになに」って何?

How would you politely say that? When you talk to a stranger, and you don't know the word he just said. Say f.e.: 落札 I understand that you could just say 「落札」の意味は何ですか? but is there specifically a ...
3
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2answers
157 views

Respectful terms for parents

There are quite a few respectful terms for parents, the least respectful of which would be お父さん and お母さん (there are less respectful ones, but they're only appropriate for your own parents or your ...