漢字. Chinese characters as used in Japanese writing as opposed to the two kana syllabaries and rōmaji (Latin letters).

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124 views

The Kanji for ありがとうございます

有難う御座います is one Kanji spelling. However, I thought, 'is ございます here an auxilliary verb, and thus are the Kanji incorrect?' Should the proper spelling be 有難うございます?
5
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2answers
369 views

What really is 人身事故?

What really is 人身事故【じんしんじこ】 (jinshin-jiko) we often hear at train stations? Some say that it always means that somebody just threw him/herself onto a train track and got killed. Others say that it's ...
3
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1answer
168 views

Confusion regarding writing a word in Kanji and Katakana

In the One Piece manga, it's quite common to see the names of character's attacks written in both Kanji and Katakana. Take as examples: Gekko Moriah's Doppelman (影法師(ドッペルマン) Dopperuman, literally ...
3
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2answers
190 views

Should hibakusha be written in kanji or kana? [closed]

I typed hibakusha as "被爆者" in "被爆者:食べ物はあまり持っていませんでした。", and someone hesitantly suggested that I use kana. Neither Wiktionary nor jisho.org suggest using kana. Is there any linguistic or stylistic ...
0
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1answer
107 views

How to read 向う?

This is a sentence from 「ふたり」 by 赤川次郎 向うは、やっぱり寒い? Does it read as むこう?If that is the case, then what is the difference between 向う and 向こう?
6
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1answer
231 views

Origin of the kanji for 叶う

One thing that has always confused me is how the word 叶【かな】う took on the meaning of for a (wish) to come true. I find this perplexing because in Chinese, the word has never had this meaning. 叶's ...
1
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1answer
81 views

I assume this means next episode number 6 “第 六話”

I've noticed this season two shows end the preview with the episode number and title underneath - 第六話 - but this confuses me. How should I read this? Is 話 still はなし or is it something else? What is ...
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0answers
76 views

What is the difference between 判{わか}る and 分{わ}かる? [duplicate]

Until now, I though the only verb for "to know" was 分かる. I saw the verb 判る used for the same meaning today. 判{わか}ってるから言{い}ったんだけどね。 I knew that. That's why I said it. (source) It has the same ...
4
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1answer
347 views

Kanji or kana in お待ちください

It's considered proper (though often ignored) to write ください in 待ってください and 下さい in 赤いのを下さい, i.e. Kanji as a main verb and kana as an auxilliary. But a thought came into my mind: in お待ちください, is it an ...
1
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1answer
140 views

How has japanese writing changed in the last century? [closed]

This is a fairly vague question and I will try and make it more specific, but, if possible, could you list the changes that have occured in japanese writing in particular? (e.g character change, ...
0
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1answer
371 views

Heisig story #30 (Nightbreak) 旦, shouldn't it mean “daybreak” instead?

I believe that the tittle already covers my question, but I will explain it better here. When I was reading the Heisig book (Remembering the Kanji, the sixth edition I believe) I came across the ...
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5answers
130 views

Which is the difference of meaning beetween 業 and 行?

I was looking at the 20 precepts of karate and I really like this one: 空手の修業は一生である The translation should be something like: Karate is a lifelong pursuit. Looking for it on google.co.jp ...
0
votes
1answer
256 views

Why importing words from other languages rather than building new ones from existing kanji? [closed]

I would like to know why, in general, new words are imported (from English among other languages) rather that created with respect to the concept/thing they represent. For example, "computer" could ...
15
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2answers
13k views

When should I replace kanji with hiragana?

When should I write 海山 and when should I write うみやま?
5
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2answers
778 views

How to read 二、三日 [duplicate]

If you have the two separate words, it's 二日{ふつか} and 三日{みっか}. But how are they read together? ふた、みっか, に、さんにち, some combination thereof or something else entirely? Source sentence for the curious: ...
2
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3answers
215 views

母 stroke order irregular compared to 日

As I have learned kanji, I have been under the impressions stroke order for box kanji like 日 should be left to right, top to bottom. Most kanji seem very consistent, or so I thought. I recently ...
4
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2answers
142 views

How to write 'seaweed'?

This video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8fVS78tvzU) says that seaweed is written like 海草、but Google Translate later told me it's instead 海藻, with 藻 as the second Kanji instead of 草. I know GT ...
4
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2answers
973 views

Which reading is more common for 剣: tsurugi or ken

剣 by itself can be read either way. What's the difference? Clarification: In particular, when 剣 refers to a 諸刃 sword, which reading are natives more likely to use?
8
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2answers
746 views

名 versus 名前: Why is this seemingly redundant Jukugo used?

For example I came across a Jukugo like this: 名 (name) + 前 (before) = 名前 (name) What is the point in having this Jukugo when you apparently can just use 名. Can someone explain this to me?
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2answers
2k views

Are all kanji compounds considered words?

A friend once commented to me that Japanese has a larger vocabulary than English. I said I didn't think it did, because it wasn't really accurate to call all kanji compounds "words". My friend said I ...
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1answer
312 views

Japanese without Kanji [closed]

Everyone says Japanese is a hard language, but if you remove the Kanji learning part from it, is it just as easy as any other language which just has a different writing system? Is spoken Japanese ...
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2answers
254 views

Is it hard to write Japanese? [closed]

I see the Japanese symbols, but never asked myself how hard is to write using these symbols. It seems very inviable. How do you guys do when writing at Japanese? Is it really harder than, for example, ...
7
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1answer
313 views

What do you call the hooked tip of a kanji stroke?

When writing a kanji, some downstrokes have a clean end (such as in 木) while others end with a little hook (e.g. the center stroke of 小). What are the names of such stroke tips?
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2answers
424 views

口ロ Those are supposed to be different characters. How can you tell? [duplicate]

The first is supposed to be the kanji for mouth, "くち" and the sencond is supposed to be katakana. When I typed them in google translate, the sizes were different so I could differentiate them that way,...
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0answers
45 views

Could someone help me identify this kanji? [duplicate]

There is 格, then that kanji that i can't recognise, and then 内 and 庫. What kanji is that one in the between the first and the third one?
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2answers
112 views
4
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1answer
166 views

Run-in with an odd use of kanji 「供膳」

I'm currently working on a translation of a song ("故" by Gremlins) and I have run into something quite strange... While it is not unusual for Japanese lyricists to use kanji with a different meaning ...
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2answers
140 views

中{なか} vs 中{ちゅう}

When to read a character as 中{なか}, and when to read it as 中{ちゅう}?
5
votes
1answer
232 views

Why is hiragana used in the middle of this compound word?

I saw this article on Gizmodo Japan: だれもがスマホの便利さを享受できる第一歩。視覚障がい者がiPhone操作を学べるアプリ Obviously, this is 視覚障害者 (or possibly, 視覚障碍者). It is in the title of the article, as well as several places ...
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2answers
6k views

Can Hiragana or Katakana stand alone?

Writing Japanese requires a mix of Kanji and Hiragana, usually some Katakana as well. I have read that some Kanji characters can be replaced with Hiragana characters for easier writing. My question ...
6
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1answer
389 views

Where does “gold day” originate from?

Recently I learned what the days of the week are and noticed "kinyobi" 金曜日. I'd like to know where the term "gold" relates to. Were people in ancient Japan paid at Friday each week?
6
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1answer
438 views

Is there a kanji for しか?

Is there kanji for しか as in 商品がひとつしかありません。
2
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1answer
335 views

Can't find this kanji

Normally, I don't have much trouble finding written kanji. However, this one has me stumped: The closest character I can find is 逃.
0
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1answer
124 views

What kind of kanji is this?

There is 格 , then THAT character that i can't recognise, and then 内 . Does someone have any idea of what that kanji is?
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1answer
141 views

Difference between「広げる」、「拡げる」

These have the same reading as ひろげる, but a different kanji. Is there any variation in connotation between these, or is it just variant spelling? Is 広げる then, as I believe it is, the more commonly used ...
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3answers
229 views

Would 日末 be a reasonable opposite to 日本?

As Japan is 日本, the origin of the sun or "Land of the Rising Sun" as it's sometimes put in English, would 日末 make sense as the "Land of the Setting Sun" as a west to Japan's east? For instance, ...
0
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1answer
507 views

What's the story behind 黒 and 黑? Why are they different?

In Chinese 'black' is 黑 and in Japanese it's 黒, but the kanji are not the same. In traditional Chinese it's exactly the same as in simplified so both are 黑 but Japanese is different. Was 黒 simplified?
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1answer
109 views

Can someone help me identify this font? [closed]

The font I am looking for here from this site doesn't seem to name out the font. If someone could answer, I would greatly appreciate it.
5
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2answers
1k views

If 鳥肉 is chicken meat, what is duck meat?

鳥 means bird or poultry. It's understandable that 鳥肉 would be chicken meat since chicken is the most popular "bird meat". But in this case where chicken has monopolized the meaning of bird, how would ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

When to use kanji (e.g. 出来る vs. できる) [duplicate]

Japanese textbooks often use できる (hiragana) instead of 出来る (kanji). Japanese variety shows sometimes use 出来る instead of できる. Another example is 出る vs. でる. Is there any difference in usage between the ...
8
votes
1answer
691 views

Where does the な in 大人 (otona) come from?

As far as I understand, the word 大人 (otona) uses the kanji 大 to represent お and the kanji 人 to represent と. According to this site the readings for 人 do not include な. Where does the な come from then?
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1answer
136 views

Difference between 誠, 実, and 本当

All of them means "truth; reality". 誠 is read as "まこと", and 実 as "じつ", however 実 can also be read as "まこと". 本当 seems to have an inclination to a thing or fact, rather than a concept, but it also means ...
0
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2answers
438 views

Why are there multiple katakana readings for a single kanji?

When I look at a kanji word I see one, or multiple Hiragana pronunciations (or should I call it translation?) - sometimes the pronunciations are for different kanjis, but that's not the question. I'...
4
votes
1answer
202 views

Why is the order of bottom-left radicals different for some kanji?

In the kanji 道, 週 and so on, the ⻌ radical is written last, then the main element. The same for 建 and 延, in which the top-right component is written first, then the 廴 radical. But in 起, 走 is written ...
2
votes
1answer
292 views

Rosetta Stone's usage of kana for words instead of kanji

As I use Rosetta Stone to learn Japanese, I only use the Kanji mode (except when I forget the reading for a kanji and then flip it briefly to furigana mode). However, I've found that for some reason ...
3
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1answer
176 views

相 used in names

When I'm introduced to a new place I often like to figure out the literal meaning of the characters as I find it can be a useful general vocabulary building exercise, particularly for things such as ...
5
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2answers
281 views

What's the reading of 二人 in this sentence?

The sentence is 二人間がしっくり行かない i'm confused when to use ににん and when to use ふたり
4
votes
1answer
135 views

Can the onyomi be longer than 2 morae?

I started learning japanese recently, and I looked back at the kanji I've learned, and I simply can't think of any kanji with an onyomi longer than 2 morae. Is there really no kanji with an onyomi ...
1
vote
1answer
222 views

Are there kanji which are NOT words by themselves (written standalone)?

In other words, are there kanji, which can only be used as a part of a kanji compound and/or with okurigana? For example: 見 - standalone kanji, a word which means "view", "outlook" 見物 - kanji ...
5
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1answer
151 views

What is this strange kanji that looks a bit like 侍, but isn't?

Staying at a ryokan recently, I received some postcards with the following little poem: What are the characters that I have highlighted in red? They look a bit like [侍]{さむらい}, but based on the ...