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I have a question about these two verbs for 'hope':

と望む (to nozomu)

ことを願う (koto wo negau)

I also write down two examples, since I have a particular question about their use:

大学に入ろうと望んでいます。 daigaku ni hairou to nozondeimasu.

父がはやく元気になることを願っています。 chichi ga hayaku genki ni naru koto wo negatteimasu.

In the first sentence we indicate the object of our hope in front of the "to" particle and we have to use the volitional form haiROU. (hairou to nozondeiru, tabeyou to nozondeiru) My question is, could I use the upper structure with naru? for example: chichi ga genki ni narou to nozondeimasu.

Naru as meaning "get 'into a condition'" might not have a volitional form, so I shouldn't use it as narou, right? Or is it grammatical?

So to me the final issue with these two verbs (to nozomu and (koto) wo negau) if there is a difference in their use, or I can put somehow verbs in front of to nozomu even if that verb cannot express a desire so I cant put it into a volitional form.

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Hmm I'd say 大学に"入りたい"と望んでいます(or入りたいと思っています/入れることを望んでいます) not 大学に"入ろう"と望んでいます... –  Choko Dec 8 '12 at 21:45
    
I see thank you. Maybe hairou is not so formal, I took it from a book, so The way you say might be more polite and safer to use toward others:) –  Dajka Laszlo Dec 8 '12 at 21:47
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●"In the first sentence we indicate the object of our hope in front of the "to" particle and we have to use the volitional form haiROU.">>> You don't have to use the volitional forms "[入]{はい}ろう" "[食]{た}べよう" etc. before [望]{のぞ}む. You can say;

京都大学に[入]{はい}りたいと[望]{のぞ}んでいます。(or思っています)
京都大学に[入]{はい}ることを望んでいます。
京都大学に[入]{はい}れることを望んでいます。

(京都大学に"入ろう"と"思って"います would be "I'm going to enter Kyoto University." rather than "I hope I can~~")

●could I use the upper structure with naru? for example: chichi ga genki ni narou to nozondeimasu.>>> If you mean "without changing the meaning, ie, the subject of 望む is the speaker", you can say;

父が元気になることを望んでいます。
父が元気になるよう(+に/にと)望んでいます。
父が元気になってくれることを望んでいます。
父が元気になってくれるよう(+に/にと)望んでいます。
父"に"元気になってほしいと望んでいます。(or思っています)
父"に"元気になってもらいたいと望んでいます。(or思っています)

(In 父が元気になろうと望んでいます/父が元気になりたいと望んでいます, the subject of 望む would be 父.)

●Naru as meaning "get 'into a condition'" might not have a volitional form, so I shouldn't use it as narou, right? Or is it grammatical?>>>We have なろう, the volitional form of なる.

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Thank you for the detailed answer!! So in 父が元気になろうと望んでいます The father is the subject for nozomu, since I put the other verb into volitional form?:) As a result according to the sentence, My father hopes he gets healthy. If I omit "chichi ga" then genki ni narou/naritai to nozondeimasu will be referring to the speaker? –  Dajka Laszlo Dec 9 '12 at 0:07
    
Yes, 元気になろうと望んでいます(though 元気になりたいと望んでいます and 元気になりたいと思っています sound more natural to me) would mean "I want/hope to be healthy". –  Choko Dec 9 '12 at 0:15
    
what is the meaning of くれる in 父が元気になってくれることを望んでいます。I am thinking of it as "I hope that Dad gets better (for me)" but surely that must be wrong? –  yadokari Dec 9 '12 at 1:47
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@dotnetN00b Sorry, maybe it's my English... I meant to say ~に入ろうと思っています means something like "I intend to do enter~ /I'm thinking of entering~". Similar in meaning to ~に入るつもりです/~に入ることを考えています. So ~~しようと思っています shows "intention" rather than "hope". –  Choko Dec 9 '12 at 17:42
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ok thank you maybe i will ask about this in a question. ( ̄ー ̄) –  yadokari Dec 9 '12 at 22:35
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