Take the 2-minute tour ×
Japanese Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the Japanese language. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been encountering this word kakemawaru 駆け回る a few times. It means running around, If I understand well. Does it mean only physically running around? For example: kids are running around in the park. Kodomotachi wa kouen de kakemawatteimasu.

Or can one also use it to express 'having a lot to do, I have been running around the city to do errands.' so that we are busy and we "run here and there" the whole day.

Thank you for your help in advance^^

share|improve this question
2  
I think this dictionary entry pretty much covers it. –  nkjt Dec 4 '12 at 14:53
    
Thank you, you are right that entry clears it perfectly!:) –  Dajka Laszlo Dec 4 '12 at 15:15
    
@DajkaLaszlo Perhaps now that you know the answer, you can post it as an answer to your own question! –  snailboat Dec 4 '12 at 15:18
    
Whoever is good with 擬声語: Can this be used interchangeably with ドタバタする? If so, in what scenarios? –  istrasci Dec 4 '12 at 15:59

1 Answer 1

As 'nkjt' supported me with a very good link, I wish to share its content that clears the issue I had with the word kakemawaru which is the following:

かけまわる 【駆け回る】

[1]【走り回る】run around [back and forth, to and fro].(※runの代わりにrushを用いる方が迅速な動きを表わす)

    子供たちは庭を駆け回って(遊んで)いる

The children are running around [主に英 about] in the garden.

[2]【奔走する】(忙しい)be busy doing; with;(忙しく動き回っている)話 be on the run.

    彼は資金集めに駆け回っている

He is running around [主に英 about] raising funds./He is busy raising funds.

    うちのお父さんはいつも忙しく駆け回っている

My father's always on the run.

share|improve this answer
1  
It looks like this answer could also be the answer to a very similar question a long time ago. japanese.stackexchange.com/q/5902/1328 –  Chris Harris Dec 5 '12 at 1:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.