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Whenever I communicate with my Japanese coworkers, I always finish my emails with どうぞよろしくお願いします。I guess in the context of an email in English it could be akin to saying "Cheers" "Regards", so I unless I write どうぞよろしくお願いします, I will be worrying that I was being too informal to that person.

When writing an email in Japanese, is there an scenario when finishing with どうぞよろしくお願いします would be considered as being out of place or context?

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Since you have tagged this question "corporate-japanese," you may want to edit the question so that it is clear that you are not talking about informal emails between friends (where どうぞよろしくお願いします would indeed be out of place). –  Amanda S May 31 '11 at 22:02
    
Thanks for the feedback. Looking back I think that maybe the 'business-japanese' tag would have been more appropiate... –  wallyqs May 31 '11 at 22:12
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Reading the comments, I removed the [corporate-japanese] tag. If it was not the right action, please feel free to revert the tag edit, perhaps explaining the reason. –  Tsuyoshi Ito Jun 9 '11 at 19:56
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up vote 11 down vote accepted

Your question is "is there a scenario when finishing with [] would be considered out of place or context?".

As you noted, 宜しくお願い is similar to "Cheers" or "Regards", but the main difference is that neither of the latter are calls to action, whereas the former has more of a feeling of asking something.

Accordingly, among coworkers, it's fine to use when you're asking for something clearly scope of Things You're Allowed To Ask. I understand that may sound subjective, but that's part of the nature of the Japanese workplace: understanding your position.

On the other hand, if you're asking your boss to do something for you personally, it may be too direct as it implies you think that the other side will comply with your asking. In those more sensitive contexts, it may be better to say 〜して頂け[ますと/れば]幸い[です/に思います], literally translating as "if you did indeed do that, I'd be happy" without asking for it so directly.

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Very good point about being careful when asking for things. –  Matti Virkkunen May 31 '11 at 23:02
    
Thansks for the well written answer and the Japanese usage hint. I'll add them to list of things I can say when requesting something. –  wallyqs May 31 '11 at 23:51
    
Nit: “〜して頂け[ます/れば]と幸い” should be “〜して頂け[ますと/れば]幸い” (note the position of と). –  Tsuyoshi Ito Jun 1 '11 at 6:18
    
@Tsuyoshi Ito - absolutely right! Fixed! –  makdad Jun 1 '11 at 6:23
    
This might be a silly question, but what do you put at the end of your email if you can't use 宜しくお願い? –  Troyen Jun 17 '11 at 23:45
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