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I need to know what しかりだ does mean. I couldn't find over internet a satisfactory meaning.

It is from a manga called Saint Seiya. Here is the whole text:

黄金聖闘士 十二人とはいえ まだ幼い者が かなり多い シルバーセイント ブロンズセイント しかりだ.

The pope is inheriting his place to a gold saint, and he is telling him that the most of gold saints are young yet. But I don't understand what he is saying about silver and bronze saints, because that last word しかりだ.

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Please provide some more context, at least a complete sentence. –  Earthliŋ Sep 30 '12 at 18:37
    
Ok. Is from a manga called saint seiya. Here is the whole text: 黄金聖闘士 十二人とはいえ まだ幼い者が かなり多い シルバーセイント ブロンズセイント しかりだ The pope is inheriting his place to a gold saint, and he is telling him that the most of gold saints are young yet. But I don't understand what he is saying about silver and bronze saints, because that last word しかりだ. –  Dex Sep 30 '12 at 18:53
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2 Answers

しかり also seen as 然り looked up in the dictionary means そのようである or そのとおりである. However, I think it has a stronger meaning than そのようである, and can often times be translated as "just like" or "exactly like" in English.

(I'm not sure how those sentences actually are written in the manga, but) I would translate the part シルバーセイント ブロンズセイント しかりだ in English to be "the silver and bronze saints are just like gold saints.

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Thank you very much for your answer. Just in case, in the manga is written this way. 黄金聖闘士----十二人とはいえ----まだ幼い者が----かなり多い----シルバーセイント----ブロンズセイント----しかりだ I don't know how jump the line, sorry. – –  Dex Sep 30 '12 at 22:21
    
Nope, the gold saints (which I assume to be higher in rank than silver and bronze saints) are just like silver and bronze saints because they're young. –  dainichi Oct 1 '12 at 2:42
    
@dainichi: Yes, I agree with your interpretation. Did I make a mistake? –  Jesse Good Oct 1 '12 at 2:45
    
You said "they (the silver and bronze saints) are just like gold saints". It's the other way around. –  dainichi Oct 1 '12 at 2:46
    
(1) You reverted from a correct explanation in revision 2 to an incorrect explanation in revision 3. (2) “there really is no difference between them and the other saints”: That might be implied depending on the context, but it is not necessarily what the speaker wants to say in the quoted part. –  Tsuyoshi Ito Oct 2 '12 at 10:58
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Adding punctuation, your sentences are as follows:

[黄金聖闘士]{ゴールドセイント}十二人とはいえまだ幼い者がかなり多い。[白銀聖闘士]{シルバーセイント}、[青銅聖闘士]{ブロンズセイント}しかりだ。

…(も)しかりだ means “so is ….” In your case, the speaker says that most of the twelve Gold Saints are young and immature, and then he/she says “So are Silver Saints and Bronze Saints”; in other words, “Also most of the Silver Saints and the Bronze Saints are young and immature.”

(I am not sure why the speaker says とはいえ in the first sentence. Interpreting it needs more context, and I will not try it here.)

As Jesse Good wrote, [然]{しか}り means そうである. It was originally a verb, and could not be followed by だ, but in modern Japanese the form しかりだ is often used.

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The pope says 十二人とはいえ because exist 12 gold saints. Thank you very much both. My doubt has been solved. –  Dex Sep 30 '12 at 23:21
    
@Dex: Glad that the answers helped. 十二人とはいえ literally means “although there are twelve (Gold Saints),” and I do not know why he says “although.” –  Tsuyoshi Ito Sep 30 '12 at 23:23
    
I would say that the "although" applies to the "gold saints" more than the "12". Basically, although they are gold saints (which I assume to be high in rank than silver and bronze), they're just like silver and bronze saints, because they're young. –  dainichi Oct 1 '12 at 2:44
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@dainichi: (1) It is possible that “although” applies to Gold Saints, as you said. (2) The second sentence cannot mean “The Gold Saints are just like Silver Saints and Bronze Saints.” It means: “Also most of the Silver Saints and the Bronze Saints are still too young.” –  Tsuyoshi Ito Oct 1 '12 at 11:10
    
The translation then would be something like this? "Although there are 12 gold saints, the most of them are young. The same happens with Silver and Bronze Saints"? –  Dex Oct 1 '12 at 20:20
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