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きのうは きょうより ひとが すくないです。

Is it saying:

X number of people yesterday < Y number of people today?

or

X number of people yesterday > Y number of people today?

I'm getting the translation of より confused and can't make heads or tails of it.

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1  
As for yesterday, compared with today, the people are few. (There were fewer people yesterday than there are today.) –  Billy Sep 14 '12 at 1:09
    
@Billy shouldn't this be an answer? –  Ataraxia Sep 14 '12 at 1:10
    
Sure, why not... –  Billy Sep 14 '12 at 1:11
    
I was going to put almost the exact same thing as my answer, but I didn't want to have a duplicate answer/comment. –  Ataraxia Sep 14 '12 at 1:16
1  
Where does this sentence come from? The sentence sounds unnatural to me because of the lack of past form. –  Tsuyoshi Ito Sep 14 '12 at 2:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As for yesterday, compared with today, the people are few. (There were fewer people yesterday than there are today.)

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Ah. So it's X number of people yesterday < Y number of people today –  dotnetN00b Sep 14 '12 at 1:23
2  
Yes. The point is that the noun suffixed by より is a point of reference to measure the rest of the sentence against. –  Billy Sep 14 '12 at 1:25

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