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The sentence "I also ate in Tokyo" can mean three different things:

(Aside from my friends who ate there), I also ate in Tokyo.

(Aside from the other places where I tried local cuisines), I also ate in Tokyo.

(Aside from shopping and other activities), I also ate in Tokyo.

How do you distinguish these sentences in Japanese, without, of course, literally translating the phase inside the parentheses? If my rusty Japanese is correct, the first two sentences may be expressed as

私も東京に食べた。 私は東京も食べた。

I have no idea how to express the third. If a direct object is specified, I suppose mo may also be used, e.g,

私は中華料理も東京に食べた。

In general, what are the ways to express "also" in Japanese when "also" pertains to a noun (which can be the object, direct object, etc), verb, adjective and other parts of a sentence?

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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

First, eating in Tokyo is expressed by : 東京で食べる (eating "at" Tokyo).

(Aside from my friends who ate there), I also ate at Tokyo. → 私東京で食べた。("I, also, ate in Tokyo.")

(Aside from the other places where I tried local cuisines), I also ate at Tokyo. → 私は東京でも食べた。 ("I ate also in Tokyo.")

(Aside from shopping and other activities), I also ate at Tokyo. → 私は東京で食べたりしました。/私は東京で食べることしました。 ("Also, I ate in Tokyo.")

Take a look at this related topic as well.


How about for i-adjectives, for example "also big".

If it's in the same sentence, you just connect the adjectives with the 〜て form.

強くて大きいです。 → It's big and strong

If it's in the/a following sentence, you format the i-adjective as 〜くもあります.

あの犀(さい)は強いです。大きくもあります。 → That rhino is strong. It's also big.

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How about for i-adjectives, for example "also big". I suppose you can say 大きいこともです。 Is there a "tari" version for adjectives? –  FrenchNoob Aug 28 '12 at 14:46
    
Yes, you can make a "tari" form of an i-adjective, but the only time I've really seen them used is in "opposites" or contrast, to say like "some things are X, some are Y". この部屋は暑かったり、寒かったりします。 ("This room is either hot or cold.") –  istrasci Aug 28 '12 at 16:46
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I hate when there is only one たり in the sentence… It's like saying "On the one hand" and never saying "On the other hand"… –  Axioplase Aug 29 '12 at 7:04
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If you express what you want to say without ambiguity, then it becomes quite logical and simple (provided you know the grammar):

(Aside from my friends who ate there):

You mean "I too, ate in Tokyo", thus: 私東京で食事しました。

(Aside from the other places where I tried local cuisines).

You mean "In Tokyo too, I ate", thus 私は東京で食事しました。

(Aside from shopping and other activities)

You mean, "I Tokyo, I also ate", thus 私は東京で食事します。

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Just a clarification. Isn't it supposed to be 食べること or is 食べこと also acceptable? –  FrenchNoob Aug 29 '12 at 13:52
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@FrenchNoob: 食事 is read as しょくじ, not たべこと (which would be unacceptable). 食事 is a noun and it means “eating a meal.” It can be used also as a verb with suru. –  Tsuyoshi Ito Aug 29 '12 at 15:27
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