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I got a message from a friend, about to go on a trip, and it ended with: お土産持しててね

I think it's basically "[I'll] bring a souvenir/gift/omiyage [for you]" but I'm not familiar with the 持してて part, I've never seen it used like that before.

And if it does mean what I think, what is a polite way to say "you don't need to do that!". Would いいえ or maybe お土産話だけよ would be OK?

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closed as off-topic by ssb, Szymon, Dono, Earthliŋ, snailboat Apr 15 at 16:30

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a simple spelling mistake, misreading, or typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. For more information, see our meta discussion on "typo questions"." – ssb, Szymon, Dono, Earthliŋ, snailboat
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It is probability a typo, "持ってってね" –  fefe Dec 10 '11 at 8:43
1  
It may refer to 持{じ}する, though I think it's plausible it is a typo. –  cypher Dec 10 '11 at 9:12
1  
お土産持しててね does not make sense to me. Although I suspect a typo, I have no idea what it is a typo for. –  Tsuyoshi Ito Dec 10 '11 at 20:41
    
Just google "お土産持しててね", you would know that phrase does not exist. –  YOU Dec 12 '11 at 3:36
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1 Answer 1

It's probably a typo. Mayebe you should ask him what he meant.

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