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Can someone explain the usage of a na-adjective with the を particle?

Like I cannot understand why we can say ほうれん草を嫌いな人もいる,

because I'd thought that it had to be a が or の particle instead of an を ?

Also, why can we say きみがなぜジャズを嫌いか私にはわからない,

shouldn't it be きみがなぜジャズが嫌いか私にはわからない ?

Source: http://tatoeba.org/eng/sentences/search?query=%E3%82%92%E5%AB%8C%E3%81%84&from=und&to=und

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The answer to this is that generally speaking, you can't use を with na-adjectives. This is not standard usage for most na-adjectives. Additionally, although Google searches also attest this kind usage for 嫌い (at least), the Tanaka Corpus is known to have errors, so it's best to be careful.

A google search for "を嫌い" shows that the large majority of results, the を is clearly being used with some other verb, e.g. Xを嫌いになった。 However, in some, it is used in the way you noted, as in the following example:

  • Yを嫌いなワケについて語られていた。

This を is clearly attached to 嫌い, not 語る. So, back to your question: why? As @Axioplase's answer suggests, this is primarily seen with 好き and 嫌い, and so I argue that the reason you see を with these "na-adjectives" is that they are derived from the verbs 好く and 嫌う, respectively. They are both transitive verbs, and as such, accept objects readily. As such, using を with them in certain circumstances is not odd at all, though it may seem so when considered primarily as na-adjectives rather than verbs. I hypothesize that this usage is common with verb-derived na-adjectives, but not other na-adjectives.

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thanks alot =D btw besides 嫌い and 好き can you think of 1 or 2 other verb-derived na-adjectives ? –  Pacerier Jul 10 '11 at 20:30
    
@Pacerier Nope! Sorry. I'll let you know if I do, though. –  rintaun Jul 10 '11 at 21:55
    
ok i'll be waiting =P –  Pacerier Jul 11 '11 at 11:36
    
In strict grammar it'd be wrong though. If you want to be Japanese grammar nazi, you can insist on usage of either Yを嫌うワケ or Yが嫌いなワケ –  syockit Jul 17 '11 at 12:22

I think it's just a nuance (which I don't understand very well) and that in some situations, having を (at least for 好き and 嫌い) instead of の or が helps reading the sentence which may have already too many other の's and が's and be too ambiguous.

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