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I'm studying for the N1. And there are several not so often used structures that you really need to know the minute differences between. One of these is the uses of 至る. As far as I know, these are the structures that I am familiar with:

  • に至って - once it reached the very point of X, at this extreme X
  • に至っても - even up to this very point of X
  • に至っては - given this extreme example, this is the situation
  • に至る - all the way to X, leading to X, more emphatic than まで?
  • に至るまで - as far as X, up until X

Am I missing any other uses or nuances?

This seems like the kind of question that should have been asked before, but I couldn't find it any searches. Sorry if this is a repeat.

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...there are several not so often used[sic] structures... Several? Like every grammar pattern in N1 is a hardly-ever-used pattern.</semi sarcasm> –  istrasci Jun 19 at 15:18
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It sounds like you understand 至る (basically reach/arrive at some point, possibly in an abstract sense) but the challenge is the differences between the so called "basics":〜て〜;〜ても〜;〜ては〜;〜まで〜 etc. –  Tim Jun 19 at 16:16
    
@Tim Yeah, that might be so. I can't quickly decide between which to use for some reason. The use of the 'basics' at this higher level seems to trip me up more than it should. But then again, there are particle questions on the N1 all the time, so I guess I'm not the only one. –  Mac Jun 19 at 23:27
    
If you add the example/question you struggle with to your question somebody might be able to explain. At the moment your question is a bit broad. –  Tim Jun 19 at 23:36
    
I agree that the question is too broad, i.e. is about more than being about 至る. You could just as well ask the same question using する as the verb here. –  chigusa Jun 20 at 5:15

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