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I have been many times blocked in a conversation because I have no way to translate "all in all" in those general contexts:

  • All in all it takes 15 minutes to get there
  • All in all this movie was quite fun

How to translate this while staying natural and perhaps by using different idioms?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

All in all it takes 15 minutes to get there
全部で15分かかる。
(more examples of this structure)

All in all this movie was quite fun
この映画は全体的におもしろかった。
(more examples, more examples, more)

This dictionary might help as well. It includes some useful phrases like 全体として見れば.

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1  
Good translation of the concept without trying to be too literal. –  VampyreSix Jun 12 at 17:36
    
Thanks, also for the dictionary. Very useful. –  Aki Jun 13 at 5:03

I think that's using all-in-all in two different senses. The first example is in the sense of "in total" whereas the second case is in the sense of "in a word". For the latter, I'd suggest you can use something like [概]{がい}して or 一言で, e.g.: 概して言えば面白い映画だった。

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Another option I haven't seen yet is つまり, which is to the effect of "In short...", and is used as a lead-in for a brief summary.

Here are some examples taken from the Tanaka Corpus:

祖母【そぼ】は耳【みみ】が遠【とお】い、つまり、耳【みみ】が少【すこ】し不自由【ふじゆう】なのだ。
My grandmother is hard of hearing. In other words she is slightly deaf.

彼【かれ】はとても太【ふと】っている、つまり、300ポンドも体重【たいじゅう】があるのだ。
He is very fat, that is, he weighs 300 pounds.

つまり、英語【えいご】はもはや、イギリスの人々【ひとびと】だけの言語【げんご】ではないということです。
It shows that English is no longer the language only of the people of England.

The last example, in particular, I think captures that nuance that you're looking for.

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