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I just had someone say this to me. I'm pretty sure I know what it means already but I came here to confirm if I'm correct or not.

こんにばんは is a combination of こんにちは and こんばんは.

こんにちは is what you would say if you meet with someone for the first time or if you already know him/her, when you meet them while going about your daily business. こんばんは is similar, except said during the evening.

こんにばんは is what you would say if you meet with someone new for the first time at night.

Is my guess correct?

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A possible (but not really equivalent) translation of this might be "good time of day".

Such words (including こんばんちはおはこんにばんは and other variations on the theme) are very informal and are somewhat humorous. They might be used when the speaker does not know the time of the day, or pretends to. For example, it's somewhat common on various personal blogs, since the author can't know at what time of the day the post will be read.

You definitely shouldn't say this to a person you meet for the first time. In this situation simple こんにちは works regardless of time of the day.

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These words like こんにばんは exist only in the net, and do not exist in the real world. You should not say these words to a person even if you meet him after many times, unless you use them as a joke. The word こん**は also exists in the net. Perhaps someone (who is familier with Regular Expression) used こん(にち|ばん)は , and then other people abbreviate them to こんにちばんは, こんにばんは, etc.. –  jovanni Oct 18 '13 at 20:20
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@jovanni: I am pretty sure that the word plays such as こんにばんは predate the internet. I remember the lyric ペンギン村からおはこんばんちは in a song used in Dr. スランプ アラレちゃん, a TV cartoon series in 1980s. –  Tsuyoshi Ito Oct 19 '13 at 0:42
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