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(Apologies for lack of clarity but thx for the quick feedback. Now on my nml PC.)

Could somebody tell me the meaning/use of both もs in bold in the following sentence? It is the background explanation for the essay titled 「さよなら、ゴジラ先生」 in the magazine, 中上級のにほんご.

Also, I am not sure about the use of こんな in the second sentence; again what is it referring to? I think it means "this kind of doctor" but what kind? should I be able to infer the adjective, or is this an invitation to read on and find out?

日本の大きな病院は、診察してもらうに時間がかかります。そして、なんだか怖い感じ。でも、こんな先生いるのですね。今月は、大病院の診察室を舞台にしたエッセーです。

The answer must surely relate to context but I should appreciate an explanation from someone who understands.

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@Tim how do you know it means "this kind/good/something doctor" ? –  oldergod Sep 6 '13 at 0:18
    
All; Thank you: 中上級 is correct. (I am not on my normal pc); I have made the mo bold; "this kind/good/something doctor" is just my guess. If it cannot be inferred please say so. T –  Tim Sep 6 '13 at 0:22
    
We know 先生 means "doctor here because of the hospital context... –  execjosh Sep 7 '13 at 2:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

日本の大きな病院は、診察してもらうに**時間がかかります。

This も means something like "even"; that everything else also takes a lot of time.

そして、なんだか怖い感じ。でも、こんな先生**いるのですね。

This も means "in the world", kind of... I think this sentence is referring not only to the doctors themselves; but, also the place where they work, or how they treat their patients. I guess they want to say something along the lines of: "everyone's so scary; it's hard to believe that there could be doctors who would work in such a place". However, this is just speculation. There needs to be more context (i.e., the whole article) to get a good grip on what they mean here...


(See comment to get complete answer to question - Tim)


Update

Thinking about it again, maybe it's more like this:

Even just getting an examination at a big hospital in Japan takes so long. It can be dreadful.

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Regarding context - I am trying to get help to understand how the title and the by-line to the magazine article are enough in themselves to introduce the article. I agree with you on the use も in both cases and with your help now understand the second sentence is drawing a contrast between the imposing hospital and the "Godzilla-sensei" in the title. They don't tell us what kind of doctor Godzilla-sensei is because they want us to read the article to find out. (Atricle ref added to question) –  Tim Sep 6 '13 at 22:58
    
Yes, I think it's definitely meant to be a "hook" to get the reader interested :) –  execjosh Sep 7 '13 at 2:28
1  
Why the downvote? –  execjosh Feb 21 at 3:43

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