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When said in English, this sentence means that you have class in the near future, despite using now. Is it okay to omit から in the sentence below, or does that change the meaning?

今から授業があるので、行かなければならない。またね。

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I agree that the sentence sounds a little "stiff". Something like 今、授業なんだ。もう行くわ! is more casual. –  istrasci Aug 7 '13 at 14:27
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You can omit 今から and the meaning will be unchanged.

Just saying 今、授業がある could be okay but I think it conveys that the class is already going on at the moment. 今から is usually like "from right now" or just "now" like in your example.
To say "from now on" implying a continuity, it would be "これから" or "今後".

By the way, you are mixing different level of speaking in your sentence. またね is quite familiar compared to your あるので and 行かなければならない which are a bit heavy.

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Yeah I know, my friend wrote this-I was just curious about 今から. What if you just say 今? Both cases just seem strange to me, saying 今から makes it seem like 'from now on' implying a very long continuity, while 今 seems to be wrong, but it seems for correct to me. –  Anthony Aug 7 '13 at 1:04
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Just saying 今、授業がある could be okay but I think it conveys that the class is already going on at the moment. 今から is usually like "from right now". To say "from now on" it would be "これから" or "今後". –  oldergod Aug 7 '13 at 1:11
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