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Seems that I stuck with modifying a noun again, in the following sentence is it only「破壊し尽す」 modifying 「背徳の欲望」 or both verbs 「玩弄し、破壊し尽す」 ?

浮世離れした幼い少女を思うさま玩弄し、破壊し尽す背徳の欲望が掻き立てられてやまない。

Full sentences: http://s.vndb.org/sf/17/17217.jpg

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"浮世離れした幼い美少女を思うさま玩弄し、破壊し尽くす" modifies "欲望". –  marasai Jun 8 '13 at 15:42
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(([浮世離]{うきよばな}れした[幼]{おさな}い少女を)(思うさま)[玩弄]{がんろう}し、[破壊]{はかい}し[尽]{つく}す)([背徳]{はいとく}の)欲望が[掻]{か}き立てられてやまない。

浮世離れした幼い少女 is the object for both 玩弄し(#1?≒[弄]{もてあそ}ぶ... "toy with"? but probably physically, not mentally) and 破壊し尽す.
思うさま(≒思うがまま) modifies 玩弄し.
玩弄し and 破壊し尽す both modify 欲望.

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Looking at the syntax, 玩弄し can't end a sentence, because if was the conjunction, a verb was missing, e.g. 玩弄するし.

Looking at the semantics, I'll try a one-pass translation over the sentence and see what happens.

{1:浮世} {2:離れ} {3:した} {4:幼い} {5:少女} を {6:思うさま}{7:玩弄}し、{8:破壊}し{9:尽す}背徳の欲望が掻き立てられてやまない。

{1:The mortal realm} {2:separation} {3:did} {4:childish} {5:girl} {6:the way she liked it} {7:mocking} {8:break stuff} {9:until exhausted}

Until here, it looks like> "[verb] the childlike girl who had seperated herself from the mortal realm played with her as [agent] liked, and eventually broke her".

浮世離れした幼い少女を思うさま玩弄し、破壊し尽す{1:背徳}の{2:欲望}が{3:掻き立てられて}{4:やまない}。

{1:immorality} {2:desire} {3:to stir up} {4:relentlessly}

"A relentless immoral desire stirring up inside the childlike girl who had separated herself from the mortal realm plagued her mind, and eventually broke her."

(Note: I have omitted 思うさま (=as one likes), as I can't make sense of an animate-subject property on an inanimate subject (玩弄 =mocking) in English.)

The other interpretation with the comma as sentence-separator could look like this:

"It mocked the girl (who had separated herself from the mortal realm) as it pleased. An immoral desire relentlessly stirred up."

The latter variant seems to miss a subject in the first part and an object in the second. The first variant combines both. So on grounds of syntactic and semantic coherence, I prefer the interpretation that the comma distributes over the verbs instead of over the sentences.

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