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I don't really know where to ask for help, usually I got the meaning of a sentence on my own but, well this sentence is giving me a hard time, it seems easy but I can't figure out what's the use of はじめて= Hajimete and どれだっけ= doredakke

This is the sentence:

はじめて
食った具だ
どれだっけ

Hajimete kutta gu da doredakke

I know that Hajimete can be adverb and means "first time", and I know it is a intransitive verb as well.

However my translation is:

"What was the first time I ate such ingredients again?"

But I don't know if this translation is right because as I said I don't really get the use of hajimete and doredakke in this case. Can anyone help with a right translation and proper explanation please? Thanks in advance.

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1  
You wrote "れだっけ" and "doredake" and "どれだっけ", which are inconsistent with one another. I made them all consistent with the kana in the quote (どれだっけ), but please edit it if I picked the wrong one. –  snailboat May 14 '13 at 0:50
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Can you add some more context? Where did you find this "sentence"? The way the lines are broken, it looks like a verse. In either case "はじめて食った具だ" and "どれだっけ" are likely to be separate sentences. –  dainichi May 14 '13 at 2:09
    
hate>>a typo for have...ですよね。。。 –  Choko May 14 '13 at 8:14
4  
I would just like to point out that this ke is a remnant of classical 助動詞 -ker-i, expressing hearsay-recollectional past. ke < ker-i < ki + ar-i. –  Dono May 14 '13 at 9:36
    
@Chocolate Or a type for 'ate', perhaps. –  snailboat May 14 '13 at 14:39

1 Answer 1

「はじめて食った具だ」

-- The subject is left out. Maybe 「これは」or something.

I know that Hajimete can be an adverb and means "first time", and I know it is an intransitive verb as well.

Yes, the はじめて is used as an adverb here. "for the first time"

「(これは)はじめて食った具だ」

-- It literally means "It's/This is an/the ingredient I've had for the first time." (The はじめて modifies the verb 食った, and the relative clause はじめて食った modifies the noun 具. The subject for the verb 食った is "I", the speaker.)
I think it's like "This is an ingredient that I have never had before" ie. "I've never had this ingredient before".

どれだっけ

Literally, "Which one was that?" "I wonder which one it was." (It's a colloquial form of "どれだったかな?")
だっけWeblio辞書


These two sentences seem less likely to be connected... If I were to think of a situation where they can be used together:
The speaker is eating some dish, and tastes something new, something that s/he has never tasted before, and goes like, (looking for the ingredient in his/her dish) "Oh? I've never tasted anything like this before... probably the ingredient was something I've never had... Hmm, do I still have some more in my dish? Maybe it was this red one, or maybe this green one... Which one was that??"
...maybe, maybe not! ^▽^

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↑コンテクストがないので、実はめっちゃ間違ってるかも・・・ –  Choko May 14 '13 at 8:50
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具 could also be "filling" for a sandwich/doughnut/... –  Earthliŋ May 14 '13 at 11:42
    
@user1205935 そうですね!ピザとか丼とかの上に乗ってるトッピングのことも「具」って言ったりするんですが、toppingでいいでしょうか? –  Choko May 14 '13 at 12:43
    
"topping"もいいですね –  Earthliŋ May 14 '13 at 13:04
    
Thank you everyone for the replies I was actually having difficulty with this sentence because I thought it was just one sentence and not two separate ones Thanks again (: –  Dai May 14 '13 at 23:34

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