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This is a conversation between two people:

  • A: [金]{かね}は?
  • B: いつもの[通]{とお}りだ。それより[公安]{こうあん}の[方]{ほう}は?
  • A: 心配するな。 私がついている。

  • A: The money?

  • B: Planned as always. Aside from that, public safety の方は?
  • A: Don't worry. We're with you.

I'm not understanding what the の方は? is doing. Or what it's supposed to mean.

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I would translate that as "How about public safety?" (although perhaps a little more context would help...). の方 generally is attached to something you're comparing to something previously mentioned, I think. –  Darius Jahandarie Apr 14 '13 at 23:26
2  
「公安」は「警視庁公安部(ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/…)です –  Choko Apr 14 '13 at 23:45
    
I thought that as well, but didn't know that you could be sure it was talking about the public safety department rather than the concept of public safety, from the given context. (It does make much more sense when talking about the department though.) –  Darius Jahandarie Apr 14 '13 at 23:51
1  
@DariusJahandarie ですね~AさんもBさんも明らかに「悪い人/[悪役]{あくやく}」だから、public safetyなんか心配しないでしょうね~^^ –  Choko Apr 15 '13 at 0:02
1  
Sorry, I just wanted to show this dialogue could be interpreted as this, without context... Don't take it seriously...^^; –  Choko Apr 17 '13 at 15:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

の[方]{ほう} is just a way of emphasizing "about".

Apart from that, what about the public safety department?

Literally, it means "direction". A similar way of saying Xの方 in English would be with "on the X side of things", i.e.

Apart from that, what about the public safety department side of things?

P.S. There was a similar question where the OP confused の[方]{ほう} with の[方]{かた}, which is grammatically viable (replace a noun with another noun), but doesn't make as much sense here.

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