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As far as I know when we talking about other people thoughts in japanese we have to use something like よう、と思う etc. But I've got a problem in the following sentence, I cannot understand と考え here about 澪, though I'm not sure if it's correct, or about 俺 ?

俺は澪が用意してくれた問題集を前に眉を寄せている。
それは、指定された範囲で高得点をとることが出来れば、明日の再テストでおまずまずの結果を残せるだろうと考え、澪が選んでくれたものだった。

Thank you very much for help!

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明日の再テストで「お」??Typo? –  Chocolate Apr 10 '13 at 12:52
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The second sentence means

それ(=The workbook that 澪 prepared for me)は、『(俺が)指定された範囲で高得点をとることが出来れば、明日の再テストでまずまずの結果を残せるだろう』と(澪が)考え 、澪が選んでくれたものだった。

(澪 chose the workbook for me, thinking "指定された範囲で高得点をとることが出来れば、明日の再テストでまずまずの結果を残せるだろう".)

The それ refers to 澪が用意してくれた問題集. The subject for とることが出来れば and 残せるだろう is the writer(俺), and the subject for と考え(て) is 澪. The 考え(て) could be rephrased as と思い / と思って.

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Thanks, but I heard we cannot say about other people thoughts like this, I thought we have to use something like と考えるよう... or maybe I'm mistaking something? –  DarkAkira Apr 10 '13 at 14:05
    
@DarkAkira: I think this only applies when you're speculating about other peoples thoughts as opposed to actually knowing them. In this case, it seems that the absolutely knows that 澪 was thinking this. –  istrasci Apr 10 '13 at 14:48
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I did a rough translation of the text:

So I took a look at this prepartory sheet that Mio had set aside for me. Now with the stuff that Mio chose for me, if I prepare in a very small area and am able to get some good points for it, then I should be able to get through tomorrow's test – I think.

As far as I am concerned, と思う and と考える are interchangeable, with と考える being a bit more on the calculative side vs. と思う expressing an opinion based on good faith.

As in the text, the test-taker wants to go probabilistically, learning only a part of the exam and expecting that the odds will be on his side that this part is being tested on. Of course he is aware that this can backfire badly, hence the quadruple stars.

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