Take the 2-minute tour ×
Japanese Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the Japanese language. It's 100% free, no registration required.

 「~がる」と「~そう」の違いは何でしょうか。感覚的に同じではないことは分かりますが、説明はできません。どうも「~がる」形はもはや口語ではあまり使われないように感じます(「怖がる」「怖そう」などの完全に意味が変わる形容詞を除く。)。そういったレジスター(言語使用域)の違いも含めての回答を期待しています。もしこの質問がDuplicateであれば、元の質問を教えていただければ幸いです。

share|improve this question
1  
「イヤがる」「イヤそう」「欲しがる」「欲しそう」「寒がる」「寒そう」などの違いですか?(「かわいがる」vs「かわいそう」は絶対に関係ないですね?) –  Choko Mar 9 '13 at 17:54
    
そうです。私の言う「~がる形」とは「うれしい」「悲しい」などの感情形容詞につくそれのことです。「かわいがる」は完全に別の動詞ですので。「怖がる~」のくだりは、そ‌​もそも「怖い」という形容詞自体が「~がる」をつけるか、「~そう」をつけるかによって完全に意味が変わってしまう例外だということです。 –  Sindry Mar 9 '13 at 17:59
    
あなたが怖がる = you are afraid. あなたが怖そう = you are scary. –  oldergod Mar 11 '13 at 6:28
add comment

1 Answer 1

I think the difference mainly lies in the following.

The ~がる forms make an assumption about the described person's internal state, whereas the ~そう form is a statement about the person's external appearance. (Maybe a bit like the difference between sympathy and empathy.)

For example for 寒がる・寒そう, using 寒がる refers to your empathizing with the person who is cold, whereas 寒そう describes the person who is cold as "looking cold".

In English the difference might be expressed as

He must feel very cold.
He looks (as though he is) very cold.

The ending ~たい gives the pair たがる・たそう. 食べたがる sounds more like someone is craving something; 食べたそう sounds more like someone looks like s/he wants to eat something (but chooses not to for reasons of politeness, for example). The former description is more emotional than the latter.

share|improve this answer
2  
I was actually curious if this was the same difference between 〜そう and 〜げ, since apparently 〜がる may come from 〜げ+ある. –  snailboat Mar 9 '13 at 21:44
    
Wow, how do you come up with all these links? It's both confusing and fascinating at the same time... Anyway, thank you for the link. As far as I can tell, the difference in nuance between ~がる and ~そう seems to resemble the difference of ~そう and ~げ. Let's see what other think. –  Earthliŋ Mar 9 '13 at 21:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.